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I'm wondering, is there a way to only execute a block if no exception was thrown?

The best I can come up with is this:

bool exception = false;
try{
    // something
}catch(Exception e){
    exception = true;
}finally{
    if(!exception){
        // i can do what i want here
    } 
}

Is there a better way?

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Do you have any "return" within your try block ? –  Guillaume May 3 '12 at 12:35
    
The answers have 18 votes between them and the question 1 vote? –  Colonel Panic May 3 '12 at 12:52
    
@Guillaume no returns –  lowerkey May 3 '12 at 13:06
1  
@MattHickford : Good (or at least right) answers to a not-so-good question, where's the problem? –  psycho May 4 '12 at 7:06

6 Answers 6

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Sure there is: put it at the bottom of the try block.

try{
    // something
    // i can do what i want here
}catch(Exception e){
    // handle exception
}

This is not entirely equivalent to your original code in the sense that if "what you want" throws, the exception will be caught locally (this would not happen with your original scheme). This is something you might or might not care about, and there's a good chance that the different behavior is also the correct one.

If you want to bring the old behavior back, you can also use this variant that doesn't require a finally just for the sake of writing the "if no exceptions" condition:

var checkpointReached = false;
try{
    // something
    checkpointReached = true;
    // i can do what i want here
}catch(Exception e){
    if (checkpointReached) throw; // don't handle exceptions after the checkpoint
    // handle exception
}
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+1, nice answer. –  Akshinthala సాయి కళ్యాణ్ May 3 '12 at 12:33
    
With the problem that if you repeat this pattern you get try-catch imbrication. So it's only recommended if you have few exceptions expected. –  dystroy May 3 '12 at 12:36
    
@dystroy: Not sure what you mean, can you elaborate? –  Jon May 3 '12 at 12:37
    
If you use this pattern once, and then in the "I can do etc." need to add another try catch, you have to imbricate it. Do it a few more time and your code is horribly imbricated. I'm sure you're experienced enough so at a time you'd separate your code in different functions but I felt this had to be pointed (it's the reason why I indicated the "return" pattern in my answer). –  dystroy May 3 '12 at 12:40
    
@dystroy: Nested try/catch is a problem by itself, and it's not dependent on which approach one chooses here. I cannot really consider return a practical solution because it assumes way too much about what the method does, so it's not applicable in the general case. –  Jon May 3 '12 at 12:43

Can you structure your code that the doSomething is the last statement in the block and it doesn't throw?

bool exception = false;
try{
  // something
  doSomething();
} catch {
}
finally {
}
share|improve this answer
    
@ Jeff Fosterno need of finally block here. –  Akshinthala సాయి కళ్యాణ్ May 3 '12 at 12:36
1  
I'd assumed there was some boilerplate cleanup code that was wanted to always run. If not, then you're definitely right, it's redundant. –  Jeff Foster May 3 '12 at 13:32

You don't need the finally clause.

A solution :

bool exception = false;
try{
    // something
}catch(Exception e){
    exception = true;
}
if(!exception){
     // u can do what u want here
} 

Usually you'll simply have a return in your catch clause so that you don't even have to test :

try{
    // something
}catch(Exception e){
   // do things
   return;
}
// u can do what u want here

or (depending on the use case and generally less clear, especially if you have more than one exception expected - you don't want to have try-catch imbrications...) :

try{
    // something
    // u can do what u want here
}catch(Exception e){
   // do things
}
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Yes there is: put it at the end of the try block :)

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Nope - what you've got is probably the best way to do it in C#.

This is assuming that:

  • You don't want the "i can do what i want here" code to run at the bottom of your try block. (Perhaps because you don't want exceptions in that code to be handled by the main catch block.)
  • You don't want the "i can do what i want here" code to run entirely outside of the try...catch...finally structure. (Perhaps because you want that code to run before some other code that's sitting inside the finally block.)
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While there is nothing wrong with your code, it's unnecessary. Simply put the code you wish to execute at the bottom of the try block:

try {
    ...
    // No errors to this point, run what you wanted to run in the finally.
}
catch(Exception e) {
    ...
}
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