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I want to make a class in C++, which other classes inherit from it. But I want to make sure that no one will be able to make an instance from this class.

Meaning:

class Animal{
public:
virtual ~Animal() {}
};

class Fish: public Animal{
};

I want to make sure that:

Fish* fish = new Fish();

would be possible, but

Animal* ana = new Animal();

would not.

How can I do it?

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Note: Fish fish; is also possible, don't go using new everywhere ;) –  Matthieu M. May 3 '12 at 13:05
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Make it an abstract class

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What is an abstract class ? How to make it abstract ? What is the best way here ? One liners... are not worth anything. –  Matthieu M. May 3 '12 at 13:03
1  
@MatthieuM. Unless you've got 78k rep. Then your one liner gets 3 upvotes :) –  jrok May 3 '12 at 13:08
    
@jrok: and one downvote from me ;) –  Matthieu M. May 3 '12 at 13:11
    
Let the OP decide if the answer is worthwhile or not. Let him ask those questions if he needs to. –  Jason May 3 '12 at 14:12
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The simplest solution is to make Animal's constructor protected:

Class Animal{
protected:
    Animal() {}
public:
    virtual ~Animal() {}
};

Since C++ does not provide explicit support for abstract classes, but you can add pure virtual functions to your class to get a similar effect. If you do not have a suitable virtual function that you'd want to make pure virtual, a common idiom is to make your destructor pure virtual, and then provide an implementation outside the header.

Class Animal{
protected:
    Animal() {}
public:
    virtual ~Animal() = 0;
};

Animal::~Animal() {
    // destructor code
}
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10.4 is a whole section about abstract classes, I would say that its support is pretty explicit, unless explicit just means to have keywords for those things. –  PlasmaHH May 3 '12 at 12:59
    
You forgot the copy constructor and there is a slicing issue if you do not also make the assignment operator protected. Abstract classes are better. –  Matthieu M. May 3 '12 at 13:02
    
@PlasmaHH By "explicit" I mean that there is no way to make a class abstract without adding a pure virtual function - a direct way of communicating the fact that your class is abstract to the compiler, even if you do not need virtual functions, or no functions at all. –  dasblinkenlight May 3 '12 at 13:05
    
@MatthieuM. I did not forget them - the OP did :) Of course the rule of three still applies. –  dasblinkenlight May 3 '12 at 13:06
1  
@PlasmaHH: I disagree with the idea that polymorphism requires a virtual destructor. This is a separate issue. In fact, it is only required for the delete on base case which is not as frequent as Java-minded people expect us to believe. That being said, the cost of a virtual destructor is so little when one already has other virtual methods that it's just simpler to add it from the get go. –  Matthieu M. May 3 '12 at 13:14
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The usual idiom for making an abstract class is to have a pure virtual destructor:

struct A
{
   A();
   virtual ~A() = 0;
};

Note that you'll have to provide an implementation for the destructor, even if it's marked as pure:

A::~A()
{
}
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+1 for not being lazy and writing the code down! –  Matthieu M. May 3 '12 at 13:00
    
In practice, I've never seen a class that needed to be abstract and didn't already have some pure virtual functions. In which case, you don't need to make the destructor pure virtual (but it should still be virtual). –  James Kanze May 3 '12 at 13:44
    
@Matthieu M.: It has nothing to do with laziness. You shouldn't assume so much about people's motives and thinking. You seriously think all short answers mean that their providers are lazy? That is an awful bias to have. Did you ever stop and consider other possibilities? Sigh. –  Jason May 3 '12 at 14:16
1  
@Jason: Irony. It's not a matter of you being lazy or not, it's just that one-liners do not make good answers. The two inherent short-comings are that they do not provide much to index for (think looking up on Google) and that should the link ever go dead... they do not provide anything. It does not mean links are bad, it means they are useful as a further reference but the answer should be able to stand on its own. –  Matthieu M. May 3 '12 at 15:34
    
@Matthieu M.: That's such a better and more thoughtful comment than implicitly accusing people of laziness. –  Jason May 3 '12 at 20:59
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The old way is to make the constructor of Animal protected.

The C++11 way is to mark the constructor as deleted.

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1  
That fails the requirement that derived classes would work... –  Matthieu M. May 3 '12 at 12:58
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