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This recent post got me busy investigating Julian date conversions in Oracle, and I've come across what I believe is a bug in Oracle 11.1. Test cases are:

Case 1.

SELECT TO_CHAR(TO_TIMESTAMP('0', 'J'), 'DD MON SYYYY') FROM DUAL

This should return "01 JAN -4713" as defined here, but instead raises the error

ORA-01854: julian date must be between 1 and 5373484

Case 2.

SELECT TO_CHAR(TO_TIMESTAMP('1', 'J'), 'DD MON SYYYY') FROM DUAL

This should return "02 JAN -4713" as an extension of the above (one day later than the Julian zero date), but instead returns "01 JAN -4712" (off by a day less than a year).

Case 3.

SELECT TO_CHAR(TO_TIMESTAMP('1721424', 'J'), 'DD MON SYYYY') FROM DUAL

returns "01 JAN 0001". That's fine (as far as it goes). If we then subtract 1 from the date value above we would expect it to return the previous day, i.e. 31 DEC -0001 (year zero does not exist); however, when we execute the following

SELECT TO_CHAR(TO_TIMESTAMP('1721423', 'J'), 'DD MON SYYYY') FROM DUAL

the following error is thrown:

ORA-01841: (full) year must be between -4713 and +9999, and not be 0

indicating that Oracle has attempted to generate a year of zero.

(Note that although TO_TIMESTAMP is used in the test cases above, the exact same problems occur when TO_DATE is used).

Does anyone know if

  1. These problems have been documented by Oracle?
  2. These problems still exist in 11.2?

Share and enjoy.


Per Phil's answer below, these issues still occur in 11.2.

Cthulhu fhtagn.


Same bugs in 10.2.0.4

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When trying to see what Oracle is supposed to do, look at Oracle's documentation, "A Julian day number is the number of days since January 1, 4712 BC."

That wording does seam to imply that Julian 1 would be one days since January 1, 4712 BC, in other words January 2. However the current implementation of Julian date calculation has been in place for a long time, with existing code depending on the behavior. (I know we'd be screwed if the definition of Julian implemented in Oracle were to change.) At this point it would be at most a documentation bug to be days since December 31, 4713 BC.

EDIT Found a reference for Julian 1 being January 1, in Call Interface Programmer's Guide. Not someplace normal database programmers would ever look at.

The following explains the year difference between wikipedia and Oracle:

Oracle Database uses the astronomical system of calculating Julian days, in which the year 4713 BC is specified as -4712. The historical system of calculating Julian days, in contrast, specifies 4713 BC as -4713. If you are comparing Oracle Julian days with values calculated using the historical system, then take care to allow for the 365-day difference in BC dates. For more information, see http://www.usno.navy.mil/USNO/astronomical-applications/astronomical-information-center/millennium.

Case 3 is news to me. Thank you for bringing it up. I do not know of any reference covering that behavior. Related:

SQL> select to_date('0001-01-01', 'YYYY-MM-DD') 
    - to_date ('-0001-12-31', 'SYYYY-MM-DD') from dual;

TO_DATE('0001-01-01','YYYY-MM-DD')-TO_DATE('-0001-12-31','SYYYY-MM-DD')
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                    367

and

SQL> select months_between(to_date('0001-01-01', 'YYYY-MM-DD')
  2      , to_date ('-0001-12-31', 'SYYYY-MM-DD')) from dual;

MONTHS_BETWEEN(TO_DATE('0001-01-01','YYYY-MM-DD'),TO_DATE('-0001-12-31','SYYYY-MM-DD'))
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                             12.0322581

Apparently the non existent year 0 is a leap year.

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2  
I see you are going through the same process as I did a few years ago. See this blogpost: rwijk.blogspot.com/2008/10/year-zero.html –  Rob van Wijk May 3 '12 at 19:26
    
OK, I can deal with Oracle's year -4712 being 4713 B.C. However, case 3 still blows the whole thing sky high. I agree it's unlikely to change due to legacy code issues, etc, blah. But the TO_DATE function could easily and safely be changed by adding a new format character/string, for example 'J2' or 'JJ', that does Julian conversions "properly" (for sufficiently broad definitions of "properly"). Per the current TO_DATE func, you can't have a year zero - but the Julian date conversion REQUIRES that year zero exist. One way or t'other, it's broke. –  Bob Jarvis May 3 '12 at 22:32
1  
@RobvanWijk - thanks for the link to your blog post. I suppose that in a product as complex and well-done as Oracle there are bound to be one or two rough edges, and apparently the year-zero thing is one of them. I suspect that most users will be untroubled by this as they won't ever want to put in a date in the B.C. era, and as your blog points out it is possible to enter a zero-year date - it's just not (IMO) clear, obvious, or consistent (and I really need clear, obvious consistency). Maybe it's just my day to tilt at windmills... :-) –  Bob Jarvis May 4 '12 at 10:51
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Here's the same queries performed on 11.2.0.1.0:

PHIL@PHILL11G2 > select * from v$version;

BANNER
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Oracle Database 11g Enterprise Edition Release 11.2.0.1.0 - 64bit Production
PL/SQL Release 11.2.0.1.0 - Production
CORE    11.2.0.1.0  Production
TNS for Linux: Version 11.2.0.1.0 - Production
NLSRTL Version 11.2.0.1.0 - Production

Elapsed: 00:00:00.04
PHIL@PHILL11G2 > SELECT TO_CHAR(TO_TIMESTAMP('0', 'J'), 'DD MON SYYYY') FROM DUAL;
SELECT TO_CHAR(TO_TIMESTAMP('0', 'J'), 'DD MON SYYYY') FROM DUAL
                            *
ERROR at line 1:
ORA-01854: julian date must be between 1 and 5373484


Elapsed: 00:00:00.00
PHIL@PHILL11G2 > SELECT TO_CHAR(TO_TIMESTAMP('1', 'J'), 'DD MON SYYYY') FROM DUAL;

TO_CHAR(TO_T
------------
01 JAN -4712

Elapsed: 00:00:00.00
PHIL@PHILL11G2 > SELECT TO_CHAR(TO_TIMESTAMP('1721424', 'J'), 'DD MON SYYYY') FROM DUAL;

TO_CHAR(TO_T
------------
01 JAN  0001

Elapsed: 00:00:00.00
PHIL@PHILL11G2 > SELECT TO_CHAR(TO_TIMESTAMP('1721423', 'J'), 'DD MON SYYYY') FROM DUAL;
SELECT TO_CHAR(TO_TIMESTAMP('1721423', 'J'), 'DD MON SYYYY') FROM DUAL
                            *
ERROR at line 1:
ORA-01841: (full) year must be between -4713 and +9999, and not be 0


Elapsed: 00:00:00.04
PHIL@PHILL11G2 > 
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So same issues in 11.2. Good to know. –  Bob Jarvis May 3 '12 at 13:25
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see U.S. NAVAL OBSERVATORY MODIFIED JULIAN DATE

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Note that link-only answers are discouraged (links tend to get stale over time). Please consider editing your answer and adding a synopsis here. –  kleopatra Jun 29 '13 at 8:38
    
Further clarification: links are best placed into comments on the question. But I do thank you for the link. :-) –  Bob Jarvis Jun 29 '13 at 11:42
    
Thanks for all your comments. I'll keep them in mind. I know it's not related to Oracle but it does explain things as so many were writing about here. I've used JDNs before but MJDNs seem like a better choice for working with long term dates. There is a post on here about that for conversions to and from them. No link. Sorry. Don't remember it. It is Java code. –  Douglas G. Allen Jun 30 '13 at 22:13
    
SQLite3 works wit JDNs. Perhaps go look at its source code. –  Douglas G. Allen Jun 30 '13 at 22:15
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