Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Here’s an interesting library writer’s dilemma. In my library (in my case EasyNetQ) I’m assigning thread local resources. So when a client creates a new thread and then calls certain methods on my library new resources get created. In the case of EasyNetQ a new channel to the RabbitMQ server is created when the client calls ‘Publish’ on a new thread. I want to be able to detect when the client thread exits so that I can clean up the resources (channels).

The only way of doing this I’ve come up with is to create a new ‘watcher’ thread that simply blocks on a Join call to the client thread. Here a simple demonstration:

First my ‘library’. It grabs the client thread and then creates a new thread which blocks on ‘Join’:

public class Library
{
    public void StartSomething()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Library says: StartSomething called");

        var clientThread = Thread.CurrentThread;
        var exitMonitorThread = new Thread(() =>
        {
            clientThread.Join();
            Console.WriteLine("Libaray says: Client thread existed");
        });

        exitMonitorThread.Start();
    }
}

Here’s a client that uses my library. It creates a new thread and then calls my library’s StartSomething method:

public class Client
{
    private readonly Library library;

    public Client(Library library)
    {
        this.library = library;
    }

    public void DoWorkInAThread()
    {
        var thread = new Thread(() =>
        {
            library.StartSomething();
            Thread.Sleep(10);
            Console.WriteLine("Client thread says: I'm done");
        });
        thread.Start();
    }
}

When I run the client like this:

var client = new Client(new Library());

client.DoWorkInAThread();

// give the client thread time to complete
Thread.Sleep(100);

I get this output:

Library says: StartSomething called
Client thread says: I'm done
Libaray says: Client thread existed

So it works, but it's ugly. I really don’t like the idea of all these blocked watcher threads hanging around. Is there a better way of doing this?

First alternative.

Provide a method that returns a worker that implements IDisposable and make it clear in the documentation that you should not share workers between threads. Here's the modified library:

public class Library
{
    public LibraryWorker GetLibraryWorker()
    {
        return new LibraryWorker();
    }
}

public class LibraryWorker : IDisposable
{
    public void StartSomething()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Library says: StartSomething called");
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Library says: I can clean up");
    }
}

The client is now a little more complicated:

public class Client
{
    private readonly Library library;

    public Client(Library library)
    {
        this.library = library;
    }

    public void DoWorkInAThread()
    {
        var thread = new Thread(() =>
        {
            using(var worker = library.GetLibraryWorker())
            {
                worker.StartSomething();
                Console.WriteLine("Client thread says: I'm done");
            }
        });
        thread.Start();
    }
}

The main problem with this change is that it's a breaking change for the API. Existing clients will have to be re-written. Now that's not such a bad thing, it would mean revisiting them and making sure they are cleaning up correctly.

Non-breaking second alternative. The API provides a way for the client to declare 'work scope'. Once the scope completes, the library can clean up. The library provides a WorkScope that implements IDisposable, but unlike the first alternative above, the StartSomething method stays on the Library class:

public class Library
{
    public WorkScope GetWorkScope()
    {
        return new WorkScope();
    }

    public void StartSomething()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Library says: StartSomething called");
    }
}

public class WorkScope : IDisposable
{
    public void Dispose()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Library says: I can clean up");
    }
}

The client simply puts the StartSomething call in a WorkScope...

public class Client
{
    private readonly Library library;

    public Client(Library library)
    {
        this.library = library;
    }

    public void DoWorkInAThread()
    {
        var thread = new Thread(() =>
        {
            using(library.GetWorkScope())
            {
                library.StartSomething();
                Console.WriteLine("Client thread says: I'm done");
            }
        });
        thread.Start();
    }
}

I like this less than the first alternative because it doesn't force the library user to think about scope.

share|improve this question
2  
'I’m assigning thread local resources' - not a good start to this :( – Martin James May 3 '12 at 13:44
2  
Unfortunately it's a constraint of the low-level AMQP library, you are not allowed to share channels between threads. I guess an alternative API design would be for the library to provide a non-thread-safe 'publisher' that the client is required to create. – Mike Hadlow May 3 '12 at 14:27
    
Not sure that I correlate the use case and the sample code correctly. Would client code of EasyNetQ be required to start a new Thread in order to use the library? can you put in a more actual client code? If not, then something in the lines of: var ctx = library.StartExecutionContext(); ... ctx.Complete(); then inside Library ctx.Complete will cleanup, maybe by using a ManualResetEvent to signal the thread to complete – Ken Egozi May 3 '12 at 14:50
    
Currently EasyNetQ provides an IBus instance which is intended to last the lifetime of the client application. To publish a message you call bus.Publish(msg); The underlying AMQP library's publish channels are not thread safe so I have to make sure that whatever threading model the client is using, I efficiently create and dispose of channels. – Mike Hadlow May 3 '12 at 15:07
1  
I don't know (or care) why the client is creating threads, but I want to design a library that doesn't fall over if they do. The channels aren't exposed to clients, but I think that maybe they should be. See my 'first alternative' above for an obvious way I could do this. – Mike Hadlow May 4 '12 at 9:52

You can create a thread static monitor that has a finalizer. When the thread is alive, it will hold the monitor object. When the thead dies it will stop holding it. Later, when GC kicks in, it will finalize your monitor. In the finalizer you can raise an event that will inform your framework about the (observed) death of the client thread.

A sample code can be found in this gist: https://gist.github.com/2587063

Here is a copy of it:

public class ThreadMonitor
{
    public static event Action<int> Finalized = delegate { };
    private readonly int m_threadId = Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId;

    ~ThreadMonitor()
    {
        Finalized(ThreadId);
    }

    public int ThreadId
    {
        get { return m_threadId; }
    }
}

public static class Test
{
    private readonly static ThreadLocal<ThreadMonitor> s_threadMonitor = 
        new ThreadLocal<ThreadMonitor>(() => new ThreadMonitor());

    public static void Main()
    {
        ThreadMonitor.Finalized += i => Console.WriteLine("thread {0} closed", i);
        var thread = new Thread(() =>
        {
            var threadMonitor = s_threadMonitor.Value;
            Console.WriteLine("start work on thread {0}", threadMonitor.ThreadId);
            Thread.Sleep(1000);
            Console.WriteLine("end work on thread {0}", threadMonitor.ThreadId);
        });
        thread.Start();
        thread.Join();

        // wait for GC to collect and finalize everything
        GC.GetTotalMemory(forceFullCollection: true);

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

I hope it helps. I think it's more elegant than your extra waiting thread.

share|improve this answer

Since you're not controlling the thread creation directly, it's hard for you to know when the thread has finished doing its work. An alternative approach maybe would be for you to force the client to notify you when they're done:

public interface IThreadCompletedNotifier
{
   event Action ThreadCompleted;
}

public class Library
{
    public void StartSomething(IThreadCompletedNotifier notifier)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Library says: StartSomething called");
        notifier.ThreadCompleted += () => Console.WriteLine("Libaray says: Client thread existed");
        var clientThread = Thread.CurrentThread;
        exitMonitorThread.Start();
    }
}

This way, any client that calls you is forced to pass in some sort of notification mechanism that will tell you when its done doing its thing:

public class Client : IThreadCompletedNotifier
{
    private readonly Library library;

    public event Action ThreadCompleted;

    public Client(Library library)
    {
        this.library = library;
    }

    public void DoWorkInAThread()
    {
        var thread = new Thread(() =>
        {
            library.StartSomething();
            Thread.Sleep(10);
            Console.WriteLine("Client thread says: I'm done");
            if(ThreadCompleted != null)
            {
               ThreadCompleted();
            }
        });
        thread.Start();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is better - the client should provide notification. The notification should have a parameter that identifies the resource being released. This parameter shoud be a handle/token for the resource allocated, ie. nothing to do with thread ID or any such like thing, else the library becomes useless for pooled threads, 'green' threads/fibers or threads that never terminate, loop around and wish to use differrent resources at the same, or different, times. – Martin James May 3 '12 at 14:19
    
This was my first idea, Provide an OperationContext that implemented IDisposable, then all the thread local calls could be executed in a using statement. I guess I wanted to explorer 'it just works' alternatives first, but I'm coming around to the idea of a specific API. – Mike Hadlow May 3 '12 at 14:30
3  
'it just works' solutions just don't <g>. Whidows, Linux, every OS I've ever used has a 'token', 'handle' or other such object as the solution to maintaining state across calls. Using inplicit thread-local data and polling for thread termination etc. will suck the life out of your library. – Martin James May 3 '12 at 14:55
    
This solution requires cooperation from the calling threads. – usr May 3 '12 at 18:31
    
Thanks Martin, I'm persuaded by your arguments, see my follow up blog post here: mikehadlow.blogspot.co.uk/2012/05/… – Mike Hadlow May 4 '12 at 10:21

If a client thread makes calls into your library that internally allocate some resources, the client should 'open' your library and get back a token for all further operations. This token could be an int index into a vector internal to the library or a void pointer to an internal object/struct. Insist that clients must close the token before terminating.

That is how 99% of all such lib calls work where state must be preserved across client calls, eg. socket handles, file handles.

share|improve this answer

Apart from doing any asynchronous fancy stuff to avoid a thread altogether, I would try to combine all the watching into a single thread that polls the .ThreadState property of all threads that have hit your library, say, every 100ms (I'm not sure how quickly you need to clean up the resources...)

share|improve this answer
1  
What happens if the client threads never terminate, but loop around opening more library channes/resources? The state-polling solution restricts the library users to threads that are continually created, and terminated. Pool threads must be banned as well as any thread that loop around. Just won't work. – Martin James May 3 '12 at 14:06
    
@MartinJames why couldn't pool threads be monitored as well? Every thread ever using the library could be registered for polling. I think this solution makes sense. – usr May 3 '12 at 18:30
    
@Martin I understand what you are saying, and I think it goes without saying that detecting thread-closure is not the only method (and not even the preferred method) of cleaning up. It's just an additional safeguard for the library against user error. You're right: If users don't close their own handles on pooled threads or the GUI thread, then they will dangle forever. – Nathan Wiebe May 3 '12 at 20:14

Your .Join solution looks pretty elegant to me. Blocked watcher threads aren't such a terrible thing.

share|improve this answer
1  
Oh yes they are! – Martin James May 3 '12 at 13:49
    
Well, all things in moderation. :p There's really no other way that I know of to be sure that the thread is complete. – IngisKahn May 3 '12 at 13:51
    
What if the thread has completed its libary operations for that channel, wants to close it and, perhaps later, open it again, or another one? The calling threads my never terminate for the life of the app, but may open and close library resources thousands of times each. None of these polling-client-thread-state solutions are useful for a library. – Martin James May 3 '12 at 14:03
    
I agree that it's a bad idea, but you could use the thread Id preclude duplicate watchers. – IngisKahn May 3 '12 at 14:09
    
This might be workable if you reduce the monitoring thread's stack size to a minimum. The CLR is committing all stack memory, unfortunately. – usr May 3 '12 at 18:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.