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var d=getEntity( {"Division": 
{
"oddTerms": 
    [           
        {
              "entity": "Sunshine",
              "Sunshine": [
                    {
                         "count": 2,
                        "entity": "Dodge"
                    },
                    {
                        "count": 1,
                        "entity": "Dodge Avenger"
                    },

              ]
        }
  ]

}});

I want to traverse through the json string and the the entity names Dodge and Dodge Avenger. Ive used the following method

for (var k in h.Division.oddTerms)
{
s=h.Division.oddTerms[k].entity;
h.Division.oddTerms[k].+s+.entity;
}

But I do think this its not the correct methd to concatenate as it is not wrking.. anyone knows the correct format?

share|improve this question
    
What are you expecting the last line in your loop to do? –  Andrew May 3 '12 at 14:05
    
I would alert it for instance.. bt I should get the value of entity Dodge and Dodge avenger alerted... –  user1371896 May 3 '12 at 14:06
    
s will have the value sunshine from the second last line and in the last line, it should append the value sunshine and get the entity names. I am trying this coz if the string contains more than one elements , it will have more values than jst sunshine.. –  user1371896 May 3 '12 at 14:15
    
Okay. So with the specific JSON above, what values do you want to display? For example: "Sunshine: Dodge, Dodge Avenger" or maybe "Sunshine: Dodge","Sunshine: Dodge Avenger"... –  Andrew May 3 '12 at 14:34
    
{Sunshine:[ Dodge, Dodge Avenger ]} This is the way I want my output to be displayed... –  user1371896 May 3 '12 at 17:17
show 4 more comments

2 Answers 2

oddTerms is an Array, not an Object. For arrays in JavaScript you need to use a for loop with a counter instead of iterating through the elements:

var concatedString = '';
for (var k=0; k<h.Division.oddTerms.length;k++)
{
    // Get the name of the entity we want to collect the entity terms of
    var entityName =h.Division.oddTerms[k].entity;
    // iterate through all the instances of each entity
    for(var j=0; j<h.Division.oddTerms[k][entityName].length;j++){
      concatedString += h.Division.oddTerms[k][entityName][j].entity;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thats not the issue,for (var k in h.Division.oddTerms) wil wrk like the foreach loop in php, the issue is with the way I appending that variable s with the value Sunshine in to the 'h.Division.oddTerms[k].+s+.entity;' –  user1371896 May 3 '12 at 13:57
    
Yeah, edited the code –  chiborg May 3 '12 at 14:02
add comment
var entityName = "",
    arrTerms = [],
    outputTemplate = '{"%entityName":[%terms]}',
    h = {
        "Division":
        {
            "oddTerms":
            [
                {
                    "entity": "Sunshine",
                    "Sunshine": [
                    {
                        "count": 2,
                        "entity": "Dodge"
                    },
                    {
                        "count": 1,
                        "entity": "Dodge Avenger"
                    },

                    ]
                }
            ]

        }
    };

for (var i = 0; i <  h.Division.oddTerms.length; i++)
{
    entityName=h.Division.oddTerms[i].entity; // "Sunshine"
    terms = h.Division.oddTerms[i][entityName];

    for (var j = 0; j < terms.length; j++) {
        arrTerms.push('"' + terms[j].entity + '"');
    }
}

// This will give you '{"Sunshine":["Dodge","Dodge Avenger"]}':
console.log(outputTemplate.replace('%entityName', entityName).replace('%terms', arrTerms.join(",")));

Edit:

Just some more on this.

JSON can be a bit confusing to work with if you're not used to working with JS and object and array "literals". In JS you can define objects and arrays in a number of ways, but the easiest (and the most preferred, by many developers) is with these literals.

Here's an example of an object:

var myObj = {
    "some prop":"some value",
    "anotherProp":"another value"
}

You can look up the members of myObj in several ways:

myObj.anotherProp // "another value"

myObj["some prop"] // you have to use this form if the property name has a space in it

For looping through the contents of an array, use the second form. For example, this won't work:

for (var strPropName in myObj) {
   console.log(myObj.strPropName); // This won't work!
}

Instead, you should loop through the properties like this:

for (var strPropName in myObj) {
    if (myObj.hasOwnProperty(strPropName)) {
       console.log(myObj[strPropName]);
    }
}

The if block is optional, but you'll avoid potential problems if you always include this in your code. It's also required by some validators.

Now, here's an example of an array:

var myArray = ["some value", "anotherValue"];

You access these with a numeric index:

myArray[0] // "some value"
myArray[1] // "anotherValue"
myArray[2] // undefined

And you can loop through them:

for (var index = 0; index < myArray.length; index++) {
    console.log(myArray[index]);
}

You can nest objects inside arrays:

myArray = [{},{},{}];

And you can nest arrays inside objects:

myObject = {"arr1":[], "arr2":[], "arr3":[]}
share|improve this answer
    
This will do the wrk, bt I want to learn more about string concatenation... –  user1371896 May 3 '12 at 14:31
    
I'll add some more here to help you along. –  Andrew May 3 '12 at 14:35
add comment

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