Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this nvarchar string for example:

declare @s as nvarchar(max)
set @s = '  ##a# bc##   ###'

So I need the spaces to be trimed but also the # chars.
How can I return just 'a# bc'?

(number of leading and trailing # may vary)

share|improve this question
1  
Do you expect # to appear anywhere else? or just leading/trailing? Always 3 ###? –  gbn May 3 '12 at 13:59
    
@gbn, yes. I will update my question. thanks for noticing. –  ZigiZ May 3 '12 at 14:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could use the following generic functions to cut arbitrary leading and trailing chars, by simply calling

dbo.LTrimX(dbo.RTrimX(' ##a# bc### ', ' #'), ' #')

Here the UDFs (adapted from here):

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.LTrimX(@str VARCHAR(MAX), @trimchars VARCHAR(255)) RETURNS VARCHAR(MAX)
     AS
     BEGIN  
     IF @str LIKE '[' + @trimchars + ']%'
     SET @str =STUFF ( @str , 1 , PATINDEX('%[^' + @trimchars + ']%', @str)-1 , '')
     RETURN @str
END

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.RTrimX(@str VARCHAR(MAX), @trimchars VARCHAR(255)) RETURNS VARCHAR(MAX)
     AS
     BEGIN
     IF @str LIKE '%[' + @trimchars + ']' 
     SET @str = REVERSE(dbo.LTrimX(REVERSE(@str), @trimchars))
     RETURN @str
END
GO
share|improve this answer
1  
Can I safely change VARCHAR to NVARCHAR in your functions? –  ZigiZ May 3 '12 at 15:33
    
As all involved functions support NVARCHAR I'd say yes, but I didn't test it. –  MicSim May 3 '12 at 15:39
    
10x. That works great. –  ZigiZ May 3 '12 at 16:27

Assuming that the abc part is only ever made up of numbers and letters:

DECLARE @s NVARCHAR(50)
SET @s = ' ##a# bc### '

SELECT 
SUBSTRING(@s,PATINDEX('%[A-Za-z0-9]%',@s),LEN(@s) - PATINDEX('%[A-Za-z0-9]%',REVERSE(@s)) -1) as string2
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.