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Every time I use Admin to list the entries of a model, the Admin count the rows in the table. Worse yet, it seems to be doing so even when you are filtering your query.

For instance if I want to show only the models whose id is 123, 456, 789 I can do:

/admin/myapp/mymodel/?id__in=123,456,789

But the queries ran (among others) are:

SELECT COUNT(*) FROM `myapp_mymodel` WHERE `myapp_mymodel`.`id` IN (123, 456, 789) # okay
SELECT COUNT(*) FROM `myapp_mymodel` # why???

Which is killing mysql+innodb. It seems that the problem is partially acknowledged in this ticket, but my issue seems more specific since it counts all the rows even if it is not supposed to.

Is there a way to disable that global rows count?

Note: I am using django 1.2.7.

share|improve this question
    
When you filter it displays e.g. "21 results (3011 total)", so the count(*) is required to display the total. To turn that off, I think you're going to have to do a lot of hacking the django admin app. –  Alasdair May 3 '12 at 14:23
    
Now I see, thanks. I guess we will have to wait for that ticket to go through, then. –  Nova May 3 '12 at 14:26
    
Note: I am using django 1.2.7. - consider upgrading. –  Burhan Khalid May 3 '12 at 14:40
    
Yeah I will, but this is an old project. –  Nova May 3 '12 at 14:46
2  
Btw, I have already found a solution but since I have less than 100 reputation I'll have to wait to post it. :p –  Nova May 3 '12 at 14:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Okay, I think I found a solution. As Peter suggested, the best approach is to work on the count property and it can be done by overriding it with custom query set (as seen in this post) that specialises the count with an approximate equivalent:

class ApproxCountQuerySet(QuerySet):
    """Counting all rows is very expensive on large Innodb tables. This
    is a replacement for QuerySet that returns an approximation if count()
    is called with no additional constraints. In all other cases it should
    behave exactly as QuerySet.

    Only works with MySQL. Behaves normally for all other engines.
    """

    def count(self):
        # Code from django/db/models/query.py

        if self._result_cache is not None and not self._iter:
            return len(self._result_cache)

        is_mysql = 'mysql' in connections[self.db].client.executable_name.lower()

        query = self.query
        if (is_mysql and not query.where and
                query.high_mark is None and
                query.low_mark == 0 and
                not query.select and
                not query.group_by and
                not query.having and
                not query.distinct):
            # If query has no constraints, we would be simply doing
            # "SELECT COUNT(*) FROM foo". Monkey patch so the we
            # get an approximation instead.
            cursor = connections[self.db].cursor()
            cursor.execute("SHOW TABLE STATUS LIKE %s",
                    (self.model._meta.db_table,))
            return cursor.fetchall()[0][4]
        else:
            return self.query.get_count(using=self.db)

Then in the admin:

class MyAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin):

    def queryset(self, request):
        qs = super(MyAdmin, self).queryset(request)
        return qs._clone(klass=ApproxCountQuerySet)

The approximate function could mess things up on page number 100000, but it is good enough for my case.

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2  
Thanks. With a little tweaking, this also worked for me in PostgreSQL, although I had to use the query SELECT reltuples::int FROM pg_class WHERE oid = '%s'::regclass; –  Cerin Jan 15 at 0:54

If this is a serious problem you may have to take Drastic Actions™.

Looking at the code for a 1.3.1 install, I see that the admin code is using the paginator returned by get_paginator(). The default paginator class appears to be in django/core/paginator.py. That class has a private value called _count which is set in Paginator._get_count() (line 120 in my copy). This in turn is used to set a property of the Paginator class called count. I think that _get_count() is your target. Now the stage is set.

You have a couple of options:

  1. Directly modify the source. I do not recommend this, but since you seem to be stuck at 1.2.7 you may find that it is the most expedient. Remember to document this change! Future maintainers (including possibly yourself) will thank you for the heads up.

  2. Monkeypatch the class. This is better than direct modification because a) if you don't like the change you just comment out the monkeypatch, and b) it is more likely to work with future versions of Django. I have a monkeypatch going back over 4 years because they still have not fixed a bug in the template variable _resolve_lookup() code that doesn't recognize callables at the top level of evaluation, only at lower levels. Although the patch (which wraps the method of a class) was written against 0.97-pre, it still works at 1.3.1.

I did not spend the time to figure out exactly what changes you would have to make for your problem, but it might be along the lines of adding a _approx_count member to appropriate classes class META and then testing to see if that attr exists. If it does and is None then you do the sql.count() and set it. You might also need to reset it if you are on (or near) the last page of the list. Contact me if you need a little more help on this; my email is in my profile.

share|improve this answer

I found Nova's answer very helpful, but i use postgres. I modified it slightly to work for postgres with some slight alterations to handle table namespaces, and slightly different "detect postgres" logic.

Here's the pg version.

class ApproxCountPgQuerySet(models.query.QuerySet):
  """approximate unconstrained count(*) with reltuples from pg_class"""

  def count(self):
      if self._result_cache is not None and not self._iter:
          return len(self._result_cache)

      if hasattr(connections[self.db].client.connection, 'pg_version'):
          query = self.query
          if (not query.where and query.high_mark is None and query.low_mark == 0 and
              not query.select and not query.group_by and not query.having and not query.distinct):
              # If query has no constraints, we would be simply doing
              # "SELECT COUNT(*) FROM foo". Monkey patch so the we get an approximation instead.
              parts = [p.strip('"') for p in self.model._meta.db_table.split('.')]
              cursor = connections[self.db].cursor()
              if len(parts) == 1:
                  cursor.execute("select reltuples::bigint FROM pg_class WHERE relname = %s", parts)
              else:
                  cursor.execute("select reltuples::bigint FROM pg_class c JOIN pg_namespace n on (c.relnamespace = n.oid) WHERE n.nspname = %s AND c.relname = %s", parts)
          return cursor.fetchall()[0][0]
      return self.query.get_count(using=self.db)
share|improve this answer

It is possible to change the default paginator used by the admin class. Here's one that caches the result for a short period of time: https://gist.github.com/e4c5/6852723

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