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I wrote a wrapper of pthread / windows native threads which mimics java's threads.

class Thread{
public:
  virtual void run()=0;
  void start();
  void join();

  virtual ~Thread(){
   join(); 
  }
};

Suppose

 class B:public Thread{
  int x;     
  void run(){
    while some condition do soemething on x;
  }
};

If an instance of B is destructed before run() returns, the thread will keep accessing x, and this is clearly undesirable. To solve the problem I need to add

B::~B(){
 join();
} 

because Thread::~Thread() is called after B::x is destroyed, so that join would have no effect.

However, if I have class C: public B with some additional data, I still need to define C::~C(){join();}

And so forth, all down the hierarchy

An alternative would be to do

template<typename R>
 struct SafeThread:public R,public Thread{
  void run(){
    R::run();
  }
};

so that R data (our previous B::x ) would be destroyed after the thread has joined. However, still

class B{
  virtual void f(){...}
  void run(){ f();}
};


class C:public SafeThread<B>{
  int y;
  void f(){
  ...something on y;
  }

}; 

would still have similar problems. Do you think there's any elegant solution for solving the problem of assuring data are destroyed after the run method terminates, without forcing every subclass SC to define SC::~SC(){join();} ?

share|improve this question
    
virtual destructors? –  maress May 3 '12 at 14:30
    
as for Nick's code, no, because in that way the base class deconstructor is called after B::x is already gone –  Fabio Dalla Libera May 3 '12 at 14:35
    
Just for reference, C++ is not Java. Because Java's GC pretty much lets you start a thread and forget about it, letting it keep itself alive til it's done, Java's thread API can take advantage of that. You can't. –  cHao May 3 '12 at 14:41
    
Ensuring that the lifetime of all data accessed by a thread exceeds the lifetime of the thread works well, as does never explictly terminating threads at all, (pools or app-lifetime threads). If I don't have to call join() for the rest of my life, it'll still be a million years too soon. –  Martin James May 3 '12 at 14:41
2  
You should consider using the other Java option: implementing Runnable rather than extending Thread. That is a much better design, a thread is not the code that the thread executes, but rather an entity that manages the execution of that code. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 3 '12 at 14:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

you may write your Thread class as a template accepting any class with operator(), which is called accordingly when Thread::run() is called. The code below shows the idea. Make changes if necessary.

template<typename T>
class MyThread
{
    T & _obj;
    MyThread() = delete;
    MyThread(T& o) : _obj(o) {}
    void run() 
    {
        _obj();
    }
    // other member functions
};

struct B {
    int data_to_process;
    void operator()() {
        // do something with data
    }
}

// usage
B b;
MyThread<B> t(b);
t.run();
share|improve this answer
    
MyThread() = delete; ? –  cHao May 3 '12 at 14:50
    
@cHao: there are 2 constructors... –  user2k5 May 3 '12 at 14:52
    
Thank you, I have an implementation which mimics this, with the "Runnable" interface,and a static Thread::Run(Runnable&) as @David suggests. I wanted to switch to the Subclass:public Thread solution for avoiding the need to create two objects every time, but if no other solution exists, I will stick with this older implementation, thank you! –  Fabio Dalla Libera May 3 '12 at 14:52
    
@user2k5: I've never seen that syntax used before to declare a constructor. What does it mean, exactly? –  cHao May 3 '12 at 14:54
1  
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas: for the delete, I just want to ensure object is always passed to the thread, and you're certainly right about the MyThread<B>. –  user2k5 May 3 '12 at 14:59

I think you just need to use a virtual destructor with the base class calling join.

E.g.

class Thread{
public:
  virtual void run()=0;
  void start();
  void join();

protected:
  virtual ~Thread() 
  {
     join( ); 
  }
};
share|improve this answer
    
no, because in that way the base class deconst is called last, i.e. when B::x is already gone –  Fabio Dalla Libera May 3 '12 at 14:32
    
Oh, I see what you mean... –  Nick May 3 '12 at 14:36
    
Might be worth updating your question to explain this –  Nick May 3 '12 at 14:36
    
I will,thank you –  Fabio Dalla Libera May 3 '12 at 14:37

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