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I'm using a Value Object which can receive an object when it is instantiated, so its default values can be updated directly when a new VO is created, like so:

public class SeatSettingsVO
{
    public var globalPosition:Point = new Point(0, 0);
    public var dealerChipOffset:Point = new Point(0, 0);
    public var chipStackOffset:Point = new Point(0, 0);

    public function SeatSettingsVO(obj:Object = null)
    {
        if (obj)
            parseSettings(obj);
    }
}

The parseSettings method uses a try/catch block in order to get only the existing properties in the object passed to the constructor (or at least, that would be the intention):

    private function parseSettings(obj:Object):void
    {
        try
        {
            this.globalPosition = obj.globalPosition;
            this.chipStackOffset = obj.chipStackOffset;
            this.dealerChipOffset = obj.dealerChipOffset;
        }
        catch (error:Error)
        {
        }
    }

Now consider this scenario: a new Value Object needs to be created, but with only one of the three properties defined:

new SeatSettingsVO({globalPosition:new Point(300, 277)})

The problem is that if obj does not contain a particular property (e.g. chipStackOffset), instead of maintaining the initial property value (Point(0,0)), the method overwrites it to null.

My guess is that accessing non-existent properties on an Object class instance, does not trigger an error, but rather, null is returned, which in turn causes the default value to be overwritten. Can anyone explain this behavior, and possibly suggest a solution ?

Thank you very much.

share|improve this question
    
My guess is that accessing non-existent properties on an Object class instance, does not trigger an error, but rather, null is returned... You are right. Checking if property exists (like @Sam DeHaan said) is the way to go. –  NemoStein May 3 '12 at 14:44
3  
@NemoStein It doesn't return null, but it returns undefined –  Brian Genisio May 3 '12 at 15:10
    
@BrianGenisio, +1. You are perfectly right. "Not defined" isn't "Empty". null and undefined are far different. Thanks for pointing out that. –  NemoStein May 3 '12 at 21:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Flex Objects have a hasOwnProperty() method that you might find useful. You can use this to check if a dynamic object has a parameter defined, and only pull it if it exists, instead of getting nulls.

if (obj.hasOwnProperty("globalPosition"))
    this.globalPosition = obj.globalPosition;
//etc...
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I agree. That would be the proper way to test the values, however, I was sure that there would be a way to do this without testing each property. Oh well... :) –  Romi Halasz May 3 '12 at 15:37

A slightly more succinct solution than the others:

this.globalPosition = obj.globalPosition || DEFAULT_GLOBAL_POSITION;

Like in Python, the || operator returns the first operand if that operand evaluates to something besides 0, null, false, NaN, "", or undefined. Otherwise, it returns the second operand as-is:

trace(new Point(3, 3) || "hi"); //(x=3, y=3)
trace(false || "hi"); //hi
trace("hi" || "bye"); //hi
trace(0 || null); //null
trace(NaN || 0); //0
trace("" || undefined); //undefined
trace(undefined || new Point(0.4, 0)); //(x=0.4, y=0)
trace(null || false); //false

As a result, you can use it to check whether a value is defined, use that value if so, and use a default value if not. I'm honestly not sure if it makes your code more or less readable, but it's an option.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I also prefer this notation, as it is much shorter and more readable than if statements or ternary operators. –  weltraumpirat May 3 '12 at 21:07
    
Nice! Thank you for the answer. –  Romi Halasz May 4 '12 at 7:39

In this case, your object is dynamic so you don't get an exception if the property doesn't exist. You do, however, get undefined. undefined evaluates to null, so you can always say:

this.globalPosition = obj.globalPosition ? obj.globalPosition : default;

where default is whatever you want to put there... even this.globalPosition would work if you want to set it back to what it was.

You can also ask if the property exists:

if( "globalPosition" in obj)
share|improve this answer
    private function parseSettings(obj:Object):void
    {
        try
        {
            this.globalPosition = obj.globalPosition;
            this.chipStackOffset = obj.chipStackOffset;// when error occured here,
            // this.chipStackOffset still waiting for a value to set and it sets to null.
            // probably dealerChipOffset doesnt change by default value.
            this.dealerChipOffset = obj.dealerChipOffset; // this is {0,0} point prob,didnt try it.
        }
        catch (error:Error)
        {
        }
    }

I would use somthing like below. Hope it helps.

    private function parseSettings(obj:Object):void
    {
       for(var name in obj){
            this[name] = obj[name];
       }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
In the first example, both chipStackOffset and dealerChipOffset are null. I have checked that already. The second example is what I was aiming for, however, if I pass an object with different properties, an error will be thrown. The try / catch block should have prevented that. But your idea is great! Thanks. –  Romi Halasz May 3 '12 at 15:00
    
To correct the above comment, you are right. Normally, the third statement wouldn't be executed if the second one would throw an error. In this case however, that doesn't happen since we're using an Object. –  Romi Halasz May 4 '12 at 7:37

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