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I have a simple code snippet

$('.box_tile_image').live('click', function() {
console.log('click');   
});

The problem is I want to use on() as live() is deprecated, however if I use on in the case above - I do not get "click", while if I replace on with live it works like a breeze.

What can be the problem?

share|improve this question
    
@T.J.Crowder thanks. Royi Namir answer was more specific for using MyWrapperElement instead of document and he was first. I still upvote your answer and wuold like to accept two answers. Thank you! –  lukas.pukenis May 3 '12 at 17:21
    
@ lukas: Never be worried about which answer you choose, it's totally up to you. There are some here on SO who will try to bully you; don't let them, it's not their place. I'm just glad my answer helped. Best, –  T.J. Crowder May 3 '12 at 17:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

the main selector should be on a WRAPPER ELEMENT

$('#MyWrapperElement').on('click',".box_tile_image",function() {
console.log('click');   
});
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The equivalent would be:

$(document).on('click', '.box_tile_image', function() {
    console.log('click');   
});

...and in fact, if you look at the jQuery source from 1.7 onward, that's all live is.

Now, that said, I'd strongly recommend hooking the click on something closer to the target elements, rather than all the way up at the document. But for a literal equivalent, if the elements in question really have no other common ancestor, that's what you would do.

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This seems natural. Thanks. However why then jQueyr on() documentation has this example: $("#dataTable tbody tr").on("click", function(event){alert($(this).text());}); –  lukas.pukenis May 3 '12 at 14:51
    
@lukas.pukenis: That's hooking the event directly on the matching tr elements, not using event delegation. on is only using event delegation when you supply a selector after the event. –  T.J. Crowder May 3 '12 at 14:52
    
Thanks for an explanation –  lukas.pukenis May 3 '12 at 14:52
    
@lukas.pukenis: No worries, glad that helped. Just FWIW, the delegating version of that would be $('#dataTable tbody').on('click', 'tr', ...) (hooking the click on the tbody) or $('#dataTable').on('click', 'tbody tr', ...) (hooking the click on the #dataTable). –  T.J. Crowder May 3 '12 at 14:54
1  
thanks! People like you really help a lot and make the SO perfect place for a help and advice! –  lukas.pukenis May 3 '12 at 17:22
$(document).on('click', '.box_tile_image', function() {
    console.log('click');   
});

or you can use delegate()

$(document).delegate('.box_tile_image', 'click', function() {
    console.log('click');   
});

Instead of document you can also use any ancestor of box_title_image.

Suppose if you have DOM like follwing:

<div id="container">
  <img class="box_tile_image" src="" alt="">
</div>

Then you can write:

$('#container').on('click', '.box_tile_image', function() {
    console.log('click');   
});

or

$('#container').delegate('.box_tile_image', 'click', function() {
    console.log('click');   
});
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