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I'm interested in the simple algorithm for particles filter given here: http://www.aiqus.com/upfiles/PFAlgo.png It seems very simple but I have no idea on how to do it practically. Any idea on how to implement it (just to better understand how it works) ?

Edit: This is a great simple example that explain how it works: http://www.aiqus.com/questions/39942/very-simple-particle-filters-algorithm-sequential-monte-carlo-method-implementation?page=1#39950

I've tried to implement it in C++: http://pastebin.com/M1q1HcN4 but I'm note sure if I do it the right way. Can you please check if I understood it well, or there are some misunderstanding according to my code ?

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <boost/random/mersenne_twister.hpp>
#include <boost/random/uniform_01.hpp>
#include <boost/random/uniform_int_distribution.hpp>

using namespace std;
using namespace boost;

double uniform_generator(void);

#define N 4 // number of particles

#define evolutionProba_A_A 1.0/3.0 // P(X_t = A | X_t-1 = A)
#define evolutionProba_A_B 1.0/3.0 // P(X_t = A | X_t-1 = B)
#define evolutionProba_B_B 2.0/3.0 // P(X_t = B | X_t-1 = B)
#define evolutionProba_B_A 2.0/3.0 // P(X_t = B | X_t-1 = A)

#define observationProba_A_A 4.0/5.0 // P(Y_t = A | X_t = A)
#define observationProba_A_B 1.0/5.0 // P(Y_t = A | X_t = B)
#define observationProba_B_B 4.0/5.0 // P(Y_t = B | X_t = B)
#define observationProba_B_A 1.0/5.0 // P(Y_t = A | X_t = A)

/// ===========================================================================

typedef struct distrib { float PA; float PB; } Distribution;

typedef struct particle
{
    Distribution distribution; // e.g. <0.5, 0.5>
    char state; // e.g. 'A' or 'B'
    float weight; // e.g. 0.8
}
Particle;

/// ===========================================================================

int main()
{
    vector<char> Y; // data observations
    Y.push_back('A'); Y.push_back('B'); Y.push_back('A'); Y.push_back('A'); Y.push_back('A'); Y.push_back('B');
    Y.push_back('A'); Y.push_back('A'); Y.push_back('B'); Y.push_back('A'); Y.push_back('B'); Y.push_back('A');
    Y.push_back('A'); Y.push_back('B'); Y.push_back('B'); Y.push_back('A'); Y.push_back('A'); Y.push_back('B');

    vector< vector<Particle> > Xall; // vector of all particles from time 0 to t

    /// Step (1) Initialisation
    vector<Particle> X; // a vector of N particles
    for(int i = 0; i < N; ++i)
    {
        Particle x;

        // sample particle Xi from initial distribution
        x.distribution.PA = 0.5; x.distribution.PB = 0.5;
        float r = uniform_generator();
        if( r <= x.distribution.PA ) x.state = 'A'; // r <= 0.5
        if( x.distribution.PA < r && r <= x.distribution.PA + x.distribution.PB ) x.state = 'B'; // 0.5 < r <= 1

        X.push_back(x);
    }

    Xall.push_back(X);
    X.clear();

    /// Observing data
    for(int t = 1; t <= 18; ++t)
    {
        char y = Y[t-1]; // current observation

        /// Step (2) Importance sampling
        float sumWeights = 0;
        vector<Particle> X; // a vector of N particles
        for(int i = 0; i < N; ++i)
        {
            Particle x;

            // P(X^i_t = A) = P(X^i_t = A | X^i_t-1 = A) * P(X^i_t-1 = A) + P(X^i_t = A | X^i_t-1 = B) * P(X^i_t-1 = B)
            x.distribution.PA = evolutionProba_A_A * Xall[t-1][i].distribution.PA + evolutionProba_A_B * Xall[t-1][i].distribution.PB;

            // P(X^i_t = B) = P(X^i_t = B | X^i_t-1 = A) * P(X^i_t-1 = A) + P(X^i_t = B | X^i_t-1 = B) * P(X^i_t-1 = B)
            x.distribution.PB = evolutionProba_B_A * Xall[t-1][i].distribution.PA + evolutionProba_B_B * Xall[t-1][i].distribution.PB;

            // sample the a particle from this distribution
            float r = uniform_generator();
            if( r <= x.distribution.PA ) x.state = 'A';
            if( x.distribution.PA < r && r <= x.distribution.PA + x.distribution.PB ) x.state = 'B';

            // compute weight of this particle according to the observation y
            if( y == 'A' )
            {
                if( x.state == 'A' ) x.weight = observationProba_A_A; // P(y = A | X^i_t = A)
                else if( x.state == 'B' ) x.weight = observationProba_A_B; // P(y = A | X^i_t = B)
            }
            else if( y == 'B' )
            {
                if( x.state == 'A' ) x.weight = observationProba_B_A; // P(y = B | X^i_t = A)
                else if( x.state == 'B' ) x.weight = observationProba_B_B; // P(y = B | X^i_t = B)
            }

            sumWeights += x.weight;

            X.push_back(x);
        }

        // normalise weights
        for(int i = 0; i < N; ++i)
            X[i].weight /= sumWeights;

        /// Step (3) resampling N particles according to weights
        float PA = 0, PB = 0;
        for(int i = 0; i < N; ++i)
        {
            if( X[i].state == 'A' ) PA += X[i].weight;
            else if( X[i].state == 'B' ) PB += X[i].weight;
        }

        vector<Particle> reX; // new vector of particles
        for(int i = 0; i < N; ++i)
        {
            Particle x;

            x.distribution.PA = PA;
            x.distribution.PB = PB;

            float r = uniform_generator();
            if( r <= x.distribution.PA ) x.state = 'A';
            if( x.distribution.PA < r && r <= x.distribution.PA + x.distribution.PB ) x.state = 'B';

            reX.push_back(x);
        }

        Xall.push_back(reX);
    }

    return 0;
}

/// ===========================================================================

double uniform_generator(void)
{
    mt19937 gen(55);
    static uniform_01< mt19937, double > uniform_gen(gen);
    return uniform_gen();
}
share|improve this question
    
When can you this filter in real world? Can you run a test against a problem with analytical solution? If you have implemented it correctely you will get the same number. It is very unlikely to get the right result with the wrong implementation! –  Alessandro Teruzzi May 11 '12 at 13:56
    
@AlessandroTeruzzi This is just an implementation of the simple example given here. I've implemented it just to better understand the particle filters concept given by this algorithm, but I'm not sure if I implemented it correctly, since I didn't understood the algorithm very well. I don't know how to test if it works, since the algorithm and its output is still not very clear to me (even if the algorithm seem very simple). –  shn May 11 '12 at 15:01
    
My first suggestion for a generic algorithm: don't try to implement something you don't fully understand. First undertand, then implement. Otherwise you wont be able to tell what is going wrong. –  J. C. Leitão May 15 '12 at 13:24
1  
@J.C.Leitão you are right, but unfortunately particle filters is one example of things that you don't really understand until you try to implement it. –  shn May 15 '12 at 14:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted
+100

This online course is very easy and straightforward to understand and to me it explained particle filters really well.

It's called "Programming a Robotic Car", and it talks about three methods of localiczation: Monte Carlo localization, Kalman filters and particle filters.

The course is completely free (it's finished now so you can't actively participate but you can still watch the lectures), taught by a Stanford professor. The "classes" were surprisingly easy for me to follow, and they are accompanied by little exercises -- some of them just logical, but a good deal of them programming. Also, homework assignments which you can play with.

It actually makes you write your own code in python for all the filters, which they also test for you. By the end of the course, you should have all 3 filters implemented in python.

Warmly recommend to check it out.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, I will check it out. But since I'm just interested in particle filters (maybe also the two other filters), should I check all the courses of all the units from the beginning ? –  shn May 15 '12 at 14:45
    
If you're interested in all the filters, you should definitely check the entire course. But even if you are not, I recommend going through the other course - it will give you a very good general overview of localization methods and you will more easily understand where each of the filters is most appropriate. I think 1 lecture can usually be done in about 4 hours -- maybe do it over 1 or 2 days if you want to take it easy ;) –  penelope May 15 '12 at 15:59
    
By the way, I will not use particle filters for robotics (localization etc), I'll use it for another problem related to online clustering of sequential data. –  shn May 15 '12 at 16:53
    
Don't personally like anything online-based :( Still think it can help you though, the explanations are very easy to follow and do not focus as much on robotics usages. Btw, should keep chatty comments to a minimum ;) –  penelope May 15 '12 at 17:27

Here are a few good links to source:

Matlab: http://wiki.esl.fim.uni-passau.de/index.php/Filtering_III:_Kalman_and_Particle_Filter

C: http://www.robots.ox.ac.uk/~misard/condensation.html (Condensation algorithm)

C++: http://robotics.usc.edu/~boyoon/particle.html

Java: http://www.oursland.net/projects/particlefilter/

share|improve this answer
    
They are somehow not what I expected. Is there anyway to implement the simple one presented in page 9 of www.cs.ubc.ca/~arnaud/doucet_defreitas_gordon_smcbookintro.ps ? –  shn May 7 '12 at 9:29
    
Sure, there are ways :) How do the links differ from your expectations? Where are you getting hung up? I believe the algorithm on p. 11. is fairly straightforward. –  Throwback1986 May 7 '12 at 14:00
    
Well, I want to implement particle filters alown from scrach just to understand it. I've edited my first post to add a simple C++ implementation of a simple example explained here: aiqus.com/questions/39942/… Can you please check if I understood it well, or there are some misunderstanding ? –  shn May 10 '12 at 11:04

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