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Sometimes an application requires quite a few SQL queries before it can do anything useful. I was wondering if there is a way to send those as a batch to the database, to avoid the overhead of going back and forth between the client and the server?

If there is no standard way to do it, I'm using the python bindings of MySQL.

PS: I know MySQL has an executemany() function, but that's only for the same query executed many times with different parameters, right?

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It'd be faster / more efficient in most cases to run the queries in parallel. –  symcbean May 3 '12 at 15:30
    
Have you ever thought about stored procedures? –  Jermin Bazazian May 3 '12 at 15:32
    
I don't know how the mysql-python connector works, but in many cases one can simultaneously send multiple queries separated by ; (perhaps after enabling a setting to permit such). –  eggyal May 3 '12 at 15:34
    
Stored procedures are an option, but I was wondering if there is an intermediate way without using them. –  static_rtti May 3 '12 at 15:34
    
@eggyal : I've just tried it, but it throws an "commands out of sync" error. I don't think it's so simple :) –  static_rtti May 3 '12 at 15:39
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1 Answer 1

This process works best on inserts

  • Make all you SQL queries into Stored Procedures. These eventually will become child stored procedures
  • Create Master Store procedure to run all other Stored Procedures.
  • Modify master Stored procedure to accept values required by child Stored Procedures
  • Modify master Stored procedure to accept commands using "if" statements to know which child stored procedures to run

If you need return data from Database use 1 stored procedure at the time.

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