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Consider for(File file : files ) in the following code. I've never seen this syntax before. I understand from context and behavior that it'a a for loop based on the number of records...similar to (for x=0;x<length.foo;++x). Beyond that though, I'm not sure. Is this shorthand for a for loop that I've not learned yet? Is this a loop specifically for objects? More importantly... how do I describe it when I want to google information about that particular syntax?

CLARIFICATION: a second question, I'm also curious how this method of recursive file listing stores the list of filenames in file. Is this an array? a collection? or...? I'd like to know how I need to read the resulting file.

public static void main(String... aArgs) throws FileNotFoundException
{
    File startingDirectory= new File("CGT");
    List<File> files = WorkingFileListing2.getFileListingNoSort(startingDirectory);
    for(File file : files )
    {
       System.out.println(file);  //print filenames
    }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It looks to me like the equivalent of a 'foreach' in C#. Searching Google for 'Java foreach' got me this: Detail on Java For-Each loop

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It is the so-called "for each" loop.

I'm also curious how this method stores the list of filenames in file.

It doesn't. It iterates over the elements of files, assigning them in turn to file (one at a time!). If you run the code, each iteration of the loop will print one filename.

how do I describe it when I want to google information about that particular syntax?

Google "java for-each".

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As a mostly C# guy I guess I was never going to get there first on a Java question... –  Holf May 3 '12 at 15:54

This is called foreach loop which is used for only objects when you dont want to remove object from the array.

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