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I have been writing:

if(Class.HasSomething() == true/false) 
{
  // do somthing
}
else
{
  // do something else
}

but I've also seen people that do the opposite:

if(true/false == Class.HasSomething())
{
  // do somthing
}
else
{
  // do something else
}

Is there any advantage in doing one or the other in terms of performance and speed? I'm NOT talking about coding style here.

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Wouldn't this be something a decent optimising compiler would do anyway? On its own, I mean? Assuming there actually IS a performance advantage? –  Yuka May 3 '12 at 15:49
6  
If the method returns a boolean, is there any point in explicitly comparing it? Why not just if (Class.HasSomething())? –  Cory May 3 '12 at 15:49

9 Answers 9

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The second example is what I've heard called "Yoda conditions"; "False, this method's return value must be". It's not the way you'd say it in English and so among English-speaking programmers it's generally looked down on.

Performance-wise, there's really no difference. The first example is generally better grammatically (and thus for readability), but given the name of your method the "grammar" involved (and the fact you're comparing bool to bool) would make the equality check redundant anyway. So, for a true statement, I would simply write:

if(Class.HasSomething()) 
{
  // do somthing
}
else
{
  // do something else
}

This would be incrementally faster, as the if() block basically has a built-in equality comparison, so if you code if(Class.HasSomething() == true) the CLR will evaluate if((Class.HasSomething() == true) == true). But, we're talking a gain of maybe a few clocks here (not milliseconds, not ticks, but clocks; the ones that happen 2 billion times a second in modern processors).

For a false condition, it's a toss-up between using the not operator: if(!Class.HasSomething()) and using a comparison to false: if(Class.HasSomething() == false). The first is more concise, but it can be easy to miss that little exclamation point in a complex expression (especially since it occurs before the entire expression) and so I'd consider equating with false to ensure that the code is readable.

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2  
Doesn't answer the question of performance. –  Peter Ritchie May 3 '12 at 15:50
    
Edited to answer the performance question. –  KeithS May 3 '12 at 15:56
    
"if(Class.HasSomething())" is the same as "if(Class.HasSomething() == true)" it is not "incrementally faster". And no, the CLR doesn't make two comparisons out of one. –  Peter Ritchie May 3 '12 at 16:05
    
What the compiler really does with "if(value == true) do" is create the equivalent of "if(!(!value))" by comparing the value with 0 with the ceq IL instruction. –  Peter Ritchie May 3 '12 at 16:08
    
The CLR evaluates the expression and determines if the value equates to true. It may optimize the existing comparison as redundant but it must make this comparison at some level. –  KeithS May 3 '12 at 16:09

They're both equivalent, but my preference is

if(Class.HasSomething())
{
  // do something
}
else
{
  // do something else
}

...for simplicity.

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Certain older-style C programmers prefer "Yoda Conditions", because if you accidentally use a single-equals sign instead, you'll get a compile time error about assigning to a constant:

if (true = Foo()) { ... }  /* Compile time error!  Stops typo-mistakes */
if (Foo() = true) { ... }  /* Will actually compile for certain Foo() */

Even though that mistake will no longer compile in C#, old habits die hard, and many programmers stick to the style developed in C.


Personally, I like the very simple form for True statements:

if (Foo()) { ... }  

But for False statements, I like an explicit comparison.
If I write the shorter !Foo(), it is easy to over-look the ! when reviewing code later.

if (false == Foo()) { ... }  /* Obvious intent */
if (!Foo())  { ... }         /* Easy to overlook or misunderstand */
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You will not see any performance difference.

The correct option is

if (Whatever())

The only time you should write == false or != true is when dealing with bool?s. (in which case all four options have different meanings)

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You will not see any performance difference, either comparison is translated into the same IL...

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if(Class.HasSomething()) 
{
  // do somthing
}

is my way. But better try to avoid a multiple method call of HasSomething(). Better expose the return value once and reuse it.

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you should write neither.

Write

if(Class.HasSomething())
{
    // do something
}
else
{
    // do something else
}

instead. If Class.HasSomething() is already a bool, it's pointless to compare it to another boolean

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There is no perf advantage here. This coding style is used to guard against situation where programmer types = instead of ==. Compiler will cathc this because true/false are constants and cannot be assigned a new value

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For the case of booleans, I'd recommend neither: just use if (method()) and if (!method()). For the case of things besides booleans, the convention of using yoda-speak, e.g. if (1 == x) came about to prevent mistakes, because if (1 = x) will throw a compiler error while if (x = 1) will not (it is valid code in C, but is probably not what you intended). In C#, such a statement is only valid if the variable was a boolean, which reduces the need to do that.

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