Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I created a form in C# where there is a image which is being converted into a boolean array, I am trying to generate a thread with a timer where the image is converted 4 times a second.

When I debug it, it works, I can trace the ticks from the timer. But when the form is running the application quits without giving a bug.

This is the initialize script:

form = new LoadForm();
form.Show();
form.BringToFront();

timer = new System.Threading.Timer(new TimerCallback(camTick), null, 0, 250);

This is the tick that works.

private void camTick(Object myObject) 
{
    if (form.isRunning) 
    {
        bool[,] ar = form.getBoolBitmap(100);
    }
}

This is the function that loads and saves the bitmap. In form1.cs

public bool[,] getBoolBitmap(uint treshold) {
        unsafe {
            Bitmap b = getBitmap();

            BitmapData originalData = b.LockBits(new Rectangle(0, 0, b.Width, b.Height), ImageLockMode.ReadOnly, PixelFormat.Format24bppRgb);

            bool[,] ar = new bool[b.Width, b.Height];

            for (int y = 0; y < b.Height; y++) {
                byte* Row = (byte*)originalData.Scan0 + (y * originalData.Stride);

                for (int x = 0; x < b.Width; x++) {
                    if ((byte)Row[x * 3] < treshold) {
                        ar[x, y] = false;
                    } else {
                        ar[x, y] = true;
                    }
                }
            }

            b.Dispose();

            return ar;
        }
    }

public Bitmap getBitmap() {
        if (!panelVideoPreview.IsDisposed) {
            Bitmap b = new Bitmap(panelVideoPreview.Width, panelVideoPreview.Height, PixelFormat.Format24bppRgb);
            using (Graphics g = Graphics.FromImage(b)) {
                Rectangle rectanglePanelVideoPreview = panelVideoPreview.Bounds;
                Point sourcePoints = panelVideoPreview.PointToScreen(new Point(panelVideoPreview.ClientRectangle.X, panelVideoPreview.ClientRectangle.Y));
                g.CopyFromScreen(sourcePoints, Point.Empty, rectanglePanelVideoPreview.Size);
            }

            return b;
        } else {
            Bitmap b = new Bitmap(panelVideoPreview.Width, panelVideoPreview.Height);
            return b;
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
I see no evidence this would run 4 times a second. The event would fire around once every 250ms. You also need to invoke your control since your trying to modify a control within a Timer thread. –  Ramhound May 3 '12 at 17:07

3 Answers 3

Is this image being stored in a Control like PictureBox? If so, make sure you're only accessing it on the control's thread. Check out Control.Invoke().

share|improve this answer

The callback from System.Threading.Timer runs on a ThreadPool thread. In that callback you are accessing a Form instance. You simply cannot do this. Well, you can, but it will not work correctly. It will fail unpredictable and sometimes spectacularly.

Use System.Windows.Forms.Timer instead. Have it tick every 4 seconds. In the Tick event get whatever data you need from the form and then pass it off to another thread for further processing.

In the following code I get the Bitmap object by calling DrawToBitmap on the UI thread. I then pass the Bitmap off to a Task where it can be converted into a bool[] in the background. Optionally, you can return that bool[] from the Task and then call ContinueWith to transfer it back to the UI thread if necessary (sounds like you probably do not need to do that though).

private void YourWindowsFormsTimer_Tick(object sender, EventArgs args)
{
  // Get the bitmap object while still on the UI thread.
  var bm = new Bitmap(panelVideoPreview.ClientSize.Width, panelVideoPreview.ClientSize.Height, PixelFormat.Format24bppRgb);
  panelVideoPreview.DrawToBitmap(bm, panelVideoPreview.ClientRectangle);

  Task.Factory
    .StartNew(() =>
    {
      // It is not safe to access the UI here.

      bool[,] ar = ConvertBitmapToByteArray(bm);

      DoSomethingWithTheArrayHereIfNecessary(ar);

      // Optionally return the byte array if you need to transfer it to the UI thread.
      return ar;
    })
    .ContinueWith((task) =>
    {
      // It is safe to access the UI here.

      // Get the returned byte array.
      bool[,] ar = task.Result;

      UpdateSomeControlIfNecessaryHere(ar);

    }, TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());
}

And ConvertBitmapToByteArray would look like this now.

public unsafe bool[,] ConvertBitmapToBoolArray(Bitmap b, uint threshold) 
{
  BitmapData originalData = b.LockBits(new Rectangle(0, 0, b.Width, b.Height), ImageLockMode.ReadOnly, PixelFormat.Format24bppRgb);

  bool[,] ar = new bool[b.Width, b.Height];

  for (int y = 0; y < b.Height; y++) 
  {
    byte* Row = (byte*)originalData.Scan0 + (y * originalData.Stride);
    for (int x = 0; x < b.Width; x++) 
    {
      if ((byte)Row[x * 3] < treshold) 
      {
        ar[x, y] = false;
      } else 
      {
        ar[x, y] = true;
      }
    }
  }
  b.Dispose();
  return ar;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, I am sorry I don't really understand what you are doing. This is the function where the boolean array is taken, I updated it at the top. It is taken from a picturebox which has a webcam projected on it with Expression Encoder DLL's. –  tversteeg May 4 '12 at 12:47
    
@ThomasVersteeg: I updated my answer. I think I understand what you are doing now...sorry for the confusion. –  Brian Gideon May 4 '12 at 16:06
up vote 0 down vote accepted

After some searching on the internet I found this out, I needed to make another function to return the bool[,], this is what I came up with:

public bool[,] invokeBitmap(uint treshold) {
        if (this.InvokeRequired) {
            return (bool[,])this.Invoke((Func<bool[,]>)delegate {
                return getBoolBitmap(treshold);
            });
        } else {
            return getBoolBitmap(treshold);
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
If you did this then the worker thread would be pointless since nothing useful would be happening on it. –  Brian Gideon May 4 '12 at 16:10
    
Mabye I didn't make myself clear...this can't possibly be the right answer. If you did it this way everything would be executing on the UI thread. You might as punt on the whole threading idea and call getBoolBitmap on the UI thread to begin with. It would be better than doing what you propose here. –  Brian Gideon May 8 '12 at 20:35
    
Oh, but it does run pretty smooth now so it's fine. –  tversteeg May 9 '12 at 15:59
    
Great...then ditch the System.Threading.Timer and use System.Windows.Forms.Timer instead. That you won't have to use Invoke at all. –  Brian Gideon May 9 '12 at 16:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.