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I want to write code for Ruby in a more Ruby-like style and ran into a problem when working with argument passing.

I have to see if ABC is nil or not. If ABC is nil, I would pass another symbol into dosomething, if not I would pass another type of hash value to compute.

Since Ruby is not like Java, it can pass a different type of argument (different keys).

How can I make the following code more beautiful?

Merging do_manything, do_otherthings, do_manythings_again into a single function is not the answer I because I would call dosomething in many places in my code:

if ABC.nil?
Apple.dosomething (:foo => DEF) { |a| 
     a.do_manything
     a.do_otherthings
     a.do_manythings_again  
}
else
Apple.dosomething (:bar => ABC) { |a| 
     a.do_manything
     a.do_otherthings
     a.do_manythings_again  
}
end
share|improve this question
    
unless ABC can be nil and false (so you need to tell one from the another), it's not idiomatic to write an explicit .nil? check. –  tokland May 3 '12 at 17:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can either switch the hash you send:

opts = ABC.nil? ? {foo:DEF} : {bar:ABC}
Apple.dosomething(opts) do |a|
  do_many_things
  do_other_things
  do_many_things_again
end

...or you can pass a lambda as the block:

stuff_to_do = ->(a) do
  do_many_things
  do_other_things
  do_many_things_again
end

if ABC.nil?
  Apple.dosomething(foo:DEF,&stuff_to_do)
else
  Apple.dosomething(bar:ABC,&stuff_to_do)
end
share|improve this answer

Using the ternary operator.

Apple.dosomething (ABC.nil? ? {foo:DEF} : {bar:ABC}) do |a|
  a.do_manything
  a.do_otherthings
  a.do_manythings_again
end

Here is the format condition ? return_if_true : return_if_false

share|improve this answer
    
In a code review I'd argue that putting a ternary statement in the method call is not good practice. –  the Tin Man May 3 '12 at 20:01
    
Since it makes it harder to read ? or... –  Kassym Dorsel May 3 '12 at 20:09
2  
Yes. Harder to read/more complicated -- though we can write that way, think of the long-term maintenance or what someone else would think as they encounter it. Any time we have to stop to parse out the code in our head we increase the chance of a bug. This particular use is fairly safe because it's a simple example. Imagine a method with a bunch of parameters, or a large hash initialization using ternary assignments, vs. one without, and find a happy medium of readability and conciseness. –  the Tin Man May 3 '12 at 20:36

You could do this:

options = if ABC.nil? then { foo: DEF } else { bar: ABC } end

Apple.do_something options do |apple| 
  apple.instance_eval do
    do_many_things
    do_other_things
    do_many_things_again
  end
end

By convention, words in names and identifiers are separated by underscores (_) and do/end is used for multiple-line blocks.

Also, I believe this question belongs on Code Review.

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