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ok, so I'm designing a page that requires a 50% width div down the centre of the page - no problem. I also need a 50% wide header across the top of my screen - no problem. Finally I need to have that header in a fixed div so that it remains at the top of my screen when I scroll - and that's where I bump into a problem, no matter how hard I try I can't seem to get that top div centered presumably because it's a fluid width and I can't really specify a pixel margin?

Here's the code I've been working on (keeping things simple for now)....

<div id="wrapper">
    <div id="topwrapper">
        <div id="top">
            <div id="topleft"></div>
            <div id="topright"></div>
        </div>
    </div>
    <div id="table">
        Lorum Ipsum to fill here.
        <div id="left"></div>
        <div id="right"></div>
    </div>
</div>

And my CSS.....

#wrapper {
    overflow:         auto;
    position:         absolute;
    top:              0px;
    left:             0px;
    height:           100%;
    width:            100%;
    background-image: url('images/background.jpg');
}

#table {
    position:         relative;
    margin:           0 auto;
    width:            50%;
    background-image: url('images/midmiddle.png');
    padding:          50px;
    padding-top:      130px;
}

#topwrapper {
    position:    fixed;
    margin-left: -112px;
    left:        50%;
    width:       50%;
    z-index:     20;
    height:      169px;
}

#top {
    position:         relative;
    margin-left:      -8px;
    left:             -50%;
    width:            100%;
    background-image: url('images/topmiddle.png');
    z-index:          20;
    height:           169px;
    padding-left:     112px;
    padding-right:    112px;
}

#left {
    position:         absolute;
    margin-left:      -162px;
    top:              0px;
    width:            112px;
    height:           100%;
    background-image: url('images/midleft.png');
    z-index:          10;
}

#right {
    position:         absolute;
    right:            -112px;
    top:              0px;
    width:            112px;
    height:           100%;
    background-image: url('images/midright.png');
    z-index:          10;
}

#topleft {
    position:         absolute;
    margin-left:      -168px;
    top:              0px;
    width:            112px;
    height:           169px;
    background-image: url('images/topleft.png');
    z-index:          10;
}

#topright {
    position:         absolute;
    right:            -56px;
    top:              0px;
    width:            112px;
    height:           169px;
    background-image: url('images/topright.png');
    z-index:          10;
}

So I've got my main wrapper at 100% wide and high to take the lot, the topleft, topright, left and right divs are within the main div to repeat the sides of my box, but the top is where I'm stuck.

The code I've posted actually works but as you can see it's a very convoluted workaround, most margins are to do with my side image dimensions but the #top -8px is the only way I can seem to get around it to work - there must be an easier way?!

Many thanks in advance for any help :)


thanks for the input - sorry about the code formatting, I put four spaces before my CSS but I guess you guys like it in a list rather than line - sorry, old habits....!

I've managed to get it working to an extent again with putting a 25% left and right on the topwrapper, a 100% width on the top and margin of -120px......now looking at that (given that my images are 112px wide) I've picked up and extra 8px somewhere as can also be seen in the original code (margin-left of -8px). Very confused as to how that's in the equation....but it's working!

I'll have a look at that fiddle, not something I'm familiar with so looking forward to learning something new :)

Many thanks for your help everyone :)

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1  
Could you be so kind as to format your css in a readable fashion? Also, a fiddle might be helpful. –  Johannes Pille May 3 '12 at 16:49
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow! Please format your code properly. A code block is inserted by indenting 4 spaces before any line of code. I've formatted the code for you this time, but please format it properly next time. For further help, see the Editing FAQ –  Second Rikudo May 3 '12 at 16:53
    
try this jsfiddle.net –  KBN May 3 '12 at 17:17
    
Here's a fiddle: jsfiddle.net/LDVmu –  Jimmy Breck-McKye May 3 '12 at 18:29

2 Answers 2

I did this by creating a fixed wrapper, then positioning the visible element as a child. See http://jsfiddle.net/LDVmu/

So, the HTML was

<div id="top"><div>I am at the top!</div></div>

<div>blah blah blah</div>

And the CSS I used was

#top {position: fixed; width: 100%;}

#top div {width: 50%; margin: auto; border: 1px solid red; background: white;}

I know it's another nested div, and it's less semantic, but I think this is the only way this will work. The centering trick with absolute and fixed positioning and left/right=0 only seems to work with explicit pixel widths.

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How about trying to set the margin to auto for #wrapper? Maybe the problem is that the wrapper hasn't been fixed in place, so maybe the #wrapper is moving, not the table?

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