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I have a string

Ex: "We prefer questions that can be answered; not just discussed "

now i want to split this string from ";" like We prefer questions that can be answered and not just discussed

is this possible in DXL.

i am learning DXL, so i don't have any idea whether we can split or not.

Note : This is not a home work.

share|improve this question

Quick join&split I could come up with. Seams to work okay.

int array_size(Array a){
    int size = 0;
    while( !null(get(a, size, 0) ) )
        size++;
    return size;
}

void array_push_str(Array a, string str){
    int array_index = array_size(a);

    put(a, str, array_index, 0);
}

string array_get_str(Array a, int index){
    return (string get(a, index, 0));
}

string str_join(string joiner, Array str_array){
    Buffer joined = create;
    int array_index = 0;

    joined += "";

    for(array_index = 0; array_index < array_size(str_array); array_index++){
        joined += array_get_str(str_array, array_index);
        if( array_index + 1 < array_size(str_array) )
            joined += joiner;
    }

    return stringOf(joined)
}

Array str_split(string splitter, string str){
    Array tokens = create(1, 1);
    Buffer buf = create;
    int str_index;

    buf = "";

    for(str_index = 0; str_index < length(str); str_index++){
        if( str[str_index:str_index] == splitter ){
            array_push_str(tokens, stringOf(buf));
            buf = "";
        }else{
            buf += str[str_index:str_index];
        }
    }
    array_push_str(tokens, stringOf(buf));

    delete buf;
    return tokens;
}
share|improve this answer

If you only split the string once this is how I would do it:

string s = "We prefer questions that can be answered; not just discussed"

string sub = ";"

int offset

int len

if ( findPlainText(s, sub, offset, len, false)) {

/* the reason why I subtract one and add one is to remove the delimiter from the out put.
 First print is to print the prefix and then second is the suffix.*/

print s[0 : offset -1]

print s[offset +1 :]


} else {
// no delimiter found
print "Failed to match"

}

You could also use regular expressions refer to the DXL reference manual. It would be better to use regular expressions if you want to split up the string by multiple delimiters such as str = "this ; is an;example"

share|improve this answer

ACTUALLY WORKS:

This solution will split as many times as needed, or none, if the delimiter doesn't exist in the string.

This is what I have used instead of a traditional "split" command. It actually skips the creation of an array, and just loops through each string that would be in the array and calls "someFunction" on each of those strings.

string s = "We prefer questions that can be answered; not just discussed"

// for this example, ";" is used as the delimiter
Regexp split = regexp "^(.*);(.*)$"

// while a ";" exists in s
while (split s) {

    // save the text before the last ";"
    string temp_s = s[match 1]

    // call someFunction on the text after the last ";"
    someFunction(s[match 2])

    // remove the text after the last ";" (including ";")
    s = temp_s
}

// call someFunction again for the last (or only) string
someFunction(s)

Sorry for necroing an old post; I just didn't find the other answers useful.

share|improve this answer

I'm sorry for necroing this post. Being new to DXL I spent some time with the same challenge. I noticed that the implementations available on the have different specifications of "splitting" a string. Loving the Ruby language, I missed an implementation which comes at least close to the Ruby version of String#split. Maybe my findings will be helpful to anybody.

Here's a functional comparison of

  • Variant A: niol's implementation (which at a first glance, appears to be the same implementation which is usually found at Capri Soft,
  • Variant B: PJT's implementation,
  • Variant C: Brett's implementation and
  • Variant D: my implementation (which provides the correct functionality imo).

To eliminate structural difference, all implementations were implemented in functions, returning a Skip list or an Array.


Splitting results

Note that all implementations return different results, depending on their definition of "splitting":

string mellow yellow; delimiter ello

    splitVariantA returns 1 elements: ["mellow yellow" ]
    splitVariantB returns 2 elements: ["m" "llow yellow" ]
    splitVariantC returns 3 elements: ["w" "w y" "" ]
    splitVariantD returns 3 elements: ["m" "w y" "w" ]

string now's the time; delimiter

    splitVariantA returns 3 elements: ["now's" "the" "time" ]
    splitVariantB returns 2 elements: ["" "now's  the time" ]
    splitVariantC returns 5 elements: ["time" "the" "" "now's" "" ]
    splitVariantD returns 3 elements: ["now's" "the" "time" ]

string 1,2,,3,4,,; delimiter ,

    splitVariantA returns 4 elements: ["1" "2" "3" "4" ]
    splitVariantB returns 2 elements: ["1" "2,,3,4,," ]
    splitVariantC returns 7 elements: ["" "" "4" "3" "" "2" "" ]
    splitVariantD returns 7 elements: ["1" "2" "" "3" "4" "" "" ]

Timing

Splitting the string 1,2,,3,4,, with the pattern , for 10000 times on my machine gives these timings:

    splitVariantA() : 406 ms
    splitVariantB() : 46 ms
    splitVariantC() : 749 ms
    splitVariantD() : 1077 ms

Unfortunately, my implementation D is the slowest. Surprisingly, the regular expressions implementation C is pretty fast.


Source code

// niol, modified
Array splitVariantA(string splitter, string str){
    Array tokens = create(1, 1);
    Buffer buf = create;
    int str_index;
    buf = "";

    for(str_index = 0; str_index < length(str); str_index++){
        if( str[str_index:str_index] == splitter ){
            array_push_str(tokens, stringOf(buf));
            buf = "";
        } 
        else
            buf += str[str_index:str_index];
    }
    array_push_str(tokens, stringOf(buf));
    delete buf;
    return tokens;
}

// PJT, modified
Skip splitVariantB(string s, string delimiter) {

    int offset  
    int len
    Skip skp = create

    if ( findPlainText(s, delimiter, offset, len, false)) {
        put(skp, 0, s[0 : offset -1])
        put(skp, 1, s[offset +1 :])
    }

    return skp  
}

// Brett, modified
Skip splitVariantC (string s, string delim) {

    Skip skp = create
    int i = 0
    Regexp split = regexp "^(.*)" delim "(.*)$"
    while (split s) {
        string temp_s = s[match 1]
        put(skp, i++, s[match 2])
        s = temp_s
    }
    put(skp, i++, s[match 2])
    return  skp
}

Skip splitVariantD(string str, string pattern) {

    if (null(pattern) || 0 == length(pattern))
        pattern = " ";

    if (pattern == " ")
        str = stringStrip(stringSqueeze(str, ' '));

    Skip result = create;
    int i = 0; // index for searching in str
    int j = 0; // index counter for result array
    bool found = true;

    while (found) {
        // find pattern     
        int pos = 0;
        int len = 0;
        found = findPlainText(str[i:], pattern, pos, len, true);

        if (found) {
            // insert into result
            put(result, j++, str[i:i+pos-1]);
            i += pos + len;
        }
    }
    // append the rest after last found pattern
    put(result, j, str[i:]);

    return result;
}
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