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I would like to know how to manipulate bits from a ByteArray. What I need is to shift the bits according to a 'table' that I have.

Table:

Bit 0 -> Bit 26
Bit 1 -> Bit 31
Bit 2 -> Bit 17
...
Bit 31 -> Bit 5

I convert the ByteArray to BitArray using this method

public static BitArray ByteArraytoBitArray(byte[] bytes)
{
    BitArray bits = new BitArray(bytes);
    return bits;
}

But I am stuck there, I don't know how to shift the bits according to the table and then back to ByteArray.

EDIT:

Code Snipet:

public static byte[] StringToByteArray(String hex)
{
    int NumberChars = hex.Length;
    byte[] bytes = new byte[NumberChars / 2];
    for (int i = 0; i < NumberChars; i += 2)
        bytes[i / 2] = Convert.ToByte(hex.Substring(i, 2), 16);
    return bytes;
}
private void button3_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    string featherearring = "00804804A02A1CA20100000000000000D2F8B6FABBB700000000000000000000";
    var strarray = StringToByteArray(featherearring);

    byte[] strarray_comp = Enc.Encrypt(strarray);

    string conv = BitConverter.ToString(strarray_comp);
    MessageBox.Show(conv.Replace("-", ""));
}



public static byte[] BitArrayToByteArray(BitArray bits)
{
    byte[] bytes = new byte[bits.Length / 8];
    bits.CopyTo(bytes, 0);
    return bytes;
}
public static byte[] Encrypt(byte[] input)
{
    BitArray source = new BitArray(input);
    BitArray target = new BitArray(source.Length);

    target[26] = source[0];
    target[31] = source[1];
    target[17] = source[2];
    target[10] = source[3];
    target[30] = source[4];
    target[16] = source[5];
    target[24] = source[6];
    target[2] = source[7];
    target[29] = source[8];
    target[8] = source[9];
    target[20] = source[10];
    target[15] = source[11];
    target[28] = source[12];
    target[11] = source[13];
    target[13] = source[14];
    target[4] = source[15];
    target[19] = source[16];
    target[23] = source[17];
    target[0] = source[18];
    target[12] = source[19];
    target[14] = source[20];
    target[27] = source[21];
    target[6] = source[22];
    target[18] = source[23];
    target[21] = source[24];
    target[3] = source[25];
    target[9] = source[26];
    target[7] = source[27];
    target[22] = source[28];
    target[1] = source[29];
    target[25] = source[30];
    target[5] = source[31];

    return BitArrayToByteArray(target);
}

my input byte array is "00804804A02A1CA20100000000000000D2F8B6FABBB700000000000000000000" and my output with zimdanen's code is "5012000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000" and it should be "501200002FD901000000000400000000BFE8C4DB140D11F40000000000000000" As you can see, it gets the first 2 bytes right, but the rest is are all null.

share|improve this question
    
Does it have to be at all fast or just correct? –  harold May 3 '12 at 17:21
    
Have a look at my answer to [c# - left shift an entire byte array][1]. [1]: stackoverflow.com/questions/8440938/… –  JamieSee May 3 '12 at 17:27
    
I wouldnt mind if the method wasn't the fastest, I really care about it doing the manipulation correctly. –  Alan Alvarez May 3 '12 at 17:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Does it need to be in place? You can create a new BitArray and just copy the bits over:

BitArray source = new BitArray(bytes);

// Create target array.
BitArray target = new BitArray(source.Length);

// Map bits.
// ...
target[26] = source[0];
// ...

Or, depending on how you want to maintain your mapping "table", you can do it like this:

// Setup mapping - <source, target>.
Dictionary<int, int> mapping = new Dictionary<int, int>();
// ...
mapping.Add(0, 26);
// ...

BitArray source = new BitArray(bytes);

// Create target array.
BitArray target = new BitArray(source.Length);

// Map bits.
foreach (int sourceIndex in mapping.Keys)
{
    int targetIndex = mapping[sourceIndex];
    target[targetIndex] = source[sourceIndex];
}
share|improve this answer
    
Doesnt have to be in place, just needs to shift the bits accordingly and then back to ByteArray EDIT: I'll look at your code and see if I get it working right :) –  Alan Alvarez May 3 '12 at 17:17
    
my input byte array is "00804804A02A1CA20100000000000000D2F8B6FABBB700000000000000000000" and my output with your code is "5012000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000" and it should be "501200002FD901000000000400000000BFE8C4DB140D11F40000000000000000" As you can see, it gets the first 2 bytes right, but then is all nulled. –  Alan Alvarez May 3 '12 at 19:26
    
Can you post a complete code snippet? –  zimdanen May 3 '12 at 19:28
    
Here is the code: pastebin.com/xsAUtmSF –  Alan Alvarez May 3 '12 at 19:35
1  
As Jim said, your mapping only works with the first 32 bits. Your data is much longer than that. You need to fix your mapping. –  zimdanen May 4 '12 at 13:10

Your first problem is that you have an array of 32 bytes that you're converting to a BitArray. You'll find that the value of the source.Count property is 256. target.Count, on the other hand, is only 32. So your Encrypt method only changes the first 32 bits of the bit array, which corresponds four bytes -- eight of your hexadecimal characters. The rest of your array will be nulls.

You can verify this by changing your BitArrayToByteArray method to fill the destination with 0xFF before doing the copy:

public static byte[] BitArrayToByteArray(BitArray bits)
{
    byte[] bytes = new byte[bits.Length / 8];
    // Fill the array with 0xFF to illustrate.
    for (int i = 0; i < bytes.Length; ++i)
    {
        bytes[i] = 0xFF;
    }
    bits.CopyTo(bytes, 0);
    return bytes;
}

I think you'll find that the result is "50120000FFFFFF...."

It's hard to tell exactly what you're trying to do. If you want to scramble the bytes in your string, there's no need to use a BitArray. If you really want to scramble the bits, then you need to scramble ALL the bits. Without more information about what you're trying to do, I don't have a suggestion. Except that perhaps you should use one of the many existing encryption algorithms rather than trying to roll your own.

share|improve this answer
    
oh great! thank you! Im not really trying to write my own algorithm here, just decrypting and encrypting back a file from a game. :) –  Alan Alvarez May 4 '12 at 6:16

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