Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

One of my (senior) coworkers does something really strange in his code.

Instead of checking a variable for null, he checks for the type. And because

null is FooType

actually returns false, this works.

public class Foo
{
    private string _bar = null;

    public string Bar
    {
        get
        {
            // strange way to check for null
            return (_bar is string) ? _bar : "";
        }
        set { _bar = value; }
    }
}

I think this is bad coding and Resharper seems to agree with me. Is there any reason to write the check this way?

Is this a valid way to check the variable? Or can this be considered bad style or maybe even harmful in some special cases?

I don't want to confront him unless I am sure that this actually does not make sense.

share|improve this question
1  
Does your senior coworker has a vb background by any chance? –  Seph May 3 '12 at 17:39
    
I think so, yes. Or vbscript at least. Is this a common expression in VB? –  atticae May 3 '12 at 17:43
    
Older versions of VB lacked much in the way of useful shorthand operators, so the above would have been the shorthand version. –  Seph May 4 '12 at 4:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

This is not a good way. A better way would be to just:

return _bar ?? string.Empty;

Is it clear when you read your colleagues code that he is looking for nulls? No, then it isn't a good choice. Probably what the "is" operator will do first is just check for null and then return false. So it becomes much cleaner to just do that yourself. Or just use the null-coalescing operator

share|improve this answer
    
"Is it clear when you read your colleagues code that he is looking for nulls?" No, but what else could he be checking for when the variable he checks clearly is string? –  atticae May 3 '12 at 17:42
2  
@atticae Does that make it a valid use of it? –  Oskar Kjellin May 3 '12 at 17:42
    
Sorry, I don't understand. I assumed he could only be checking for null because the variable he checks ("_bar" above) is always of type string. –  atticae May 3 '12 at 17:45
1  
Actually, the IL operator behind is and as is the same, "isinst", which acts pretty much like as; it checks to see if the popped reference is an instance of a passed class identifier, and pushes the instance if true, null if not. as uses isinst pretty much verbatim, while is additionally tests that the pushed result of isinst is null. –  KeithS May 3 '12 at 17:46
1  
@KeithS That makes this usage even worse in terms of performance –  Oskar Kjellin May 3 '12 at 17:54

I think this code is completely confusing and would never use it. _bar is declared as a string so this type check is just begging people to not understand the code.

share|improve this answer

Yeah that's a little odd. Why not just write:

return _bar ?? "" ;

When I need to do something like this, I have a little class to handle these details:

public class DefaultableValue<T>
{
    private T m_Value = default(T);
    public T Value
    {
        get
        {
            if (IsInvalidPredicate(m_Value))
            {
                m_Value = IfDefaultValueFunc();
            }
            return m_Value;
        }
    }
    private Predicate<T> IsInvalidPredicate { get; set; }
    private Func<T> IfDefaultValueFunc { get; set; }
    public static implicit operator T(DefaultableValue<T> property)
    {
        return property.Value;
    }
    public DefaultableValue(Predicate<T> isInvalidPredicate,Func<T> ifDefaultFunc)
        : this(default(T), isInvalidPredicate, ifDefaultFunc)
    {
    }
    public DefaultableValue(T initValue, Predicate<T> isInvalidPredicate, Func<T> ifDefaultFunc)
    {
        this.m_Value = initValue;
        this.IsInvalidPredicate = isInvalidPredicate;
        this.IfDefaultValueFunc = ifDefaultFunc;
    }
}

Then my class looks like

class Test
{
    DefaultableValue<string> AString { get; set; }

    public Test(string initialValue)
    {
        this.AString = new DefaultableValue<string>(initialValue, 
            (value) => string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(value),
            () => string.Empty);
    }
}

....
var test = new Test(null);
var someString = test.AString; // = "" not null
share|improve this answer
    
There are too many people out there that have never heard of ??. –  Kendall Frey May 3 '12 at 17:39

if the above public property was declared to return object instead of string, the above could make sense. However, because it is returning string, that type of check does not make sense. If you want to return an empty string that you could do something like this:

public class Foo 
{ 
    private string _bar = null; 

    public string Bar 
    { 
        get 
        {  
            return (String.IsNullOrWhitespace(_bar)) ? "": _bar; 
        } 
        set { _bar = value; } 
    } 
} 
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.