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Two classes in the same assembly: Class A and Static Class B

In a method of ClassA, I am calling a method in ClassB,... but I want that to be called only one time and not every single time that I am caling that method of ClassA ... currently I am setting a global property -Ran - to see if that method has been ran before or not...well it works but I feel that this is not the best design. I was wondering if there are better ways to do the same?

Thanks.

ClassA.MyMethod(...)
{
....
//.... 
if (ClassB.Ran != 1)
    ClassB.Foo();
....
//...
}
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1  
That's likely the best design. I'm not clear what else you are looking for. –  Jonathan Wood May 3 '12 at 18:37
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to be careful on how strictly the “only one time” restriction is to be interpreted. Static methods are generally assumed to be thread-safe; if you really want to ensure that your method is only run once, even in the case of racing threads, then you need to use a synchronization mechanism, the simplest example being a lock:

private static bool isRun = false;
private static readonly object syncLock = new object();

public void MyMethod()
{
    lock (syncLock)
    {
        if (!isRun)
        {
            Foo();            
            isRun = true;
        }
    }
}
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good call. Will consider that. Thanks –  BDotA May 3 '12 at 18:46
    
That's one really nice feature of Lazy<T> as well, it handles this detail for you. –  asawyer May 3 '12 at 18:47
1  
@asawyer: Agreed, and I generally prefer to use Lazy<T> for field initialization. However, the given example did not indicate that any particular field was being initialized. Invoking a property getter just to call an initialization method as a side-effect, without returning any significant value, is non-intuitive. –  Douglas May 3 '12 at 18:51
    
@Douglas Hm that is actually a really good point. –  asawyer May 3 '12 at 18:53
    
@Douglas Might consider throwing an if(isRun) return; before the lock to save some threading overhead in the long run. –  EtherDragon May 3 '12 at 20:37
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You could use a private static field on the class, so that a result gets set the first time the method is called, preventing it from running again:

class B
{
  private static bool fooRun = false;

  public static void Foo()
  {
    if (fooRun) { return; }
    ...
    fooRun = true;
  }
}
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@BDotA You don't want other classes checking to see if the code in ClassB ran; that leads to poor OOP, and hard to maintain code. Centralize that check in ClassB, so that ClassB is the single authority on it's own state, like Adam V suggests. –  EtherDragon May 3 '12 at 18:50
    
@EtherDragon : Yes, Centralizing it like Adam did in ClassB is better idea. Thanks –  BDotA May 3 '12 at 18:54
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I would normally do this with Lazy<T>

Consider:

public static class Test // this is your ClassB
{
    private static Lazy<string> m_Property = new Lazy<string>( ()=>
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Lazy invoked"); 
        return "hi";
    },true);
    public static string Property
    {
        get
        {
            Console.WriteLine("value request");
            return m_Property.Value;
        }
    }
}

//....consuming code, this is in your ClassA somewhere

var test1 = Test.Property; // first call, lazy is invoked
var test2 = Test.Property; // cached value is used, delgate not invoked
var test3 = Test.Property; // cached value is used, delgate not invoked
var test4 = Test.Property; // cached value is used, delgate not invoked
var test5 = Test.Property; // cached value is used, delgate not invoked

This is the output:

value request
Lazy invoked
value request
value request
value request
value request
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Hmm...a little confused? can you please use the same names like ClassA, ClassB, etc... that I habe used so in my head I can map your code to my question? thanks –  BDotA May 3 '12 at 18:45
    
That's really cool! TIL about Lazy<T>. –  Adam V May 3 '12 at 18:46
1  
@BDotA I added some clarification to the comments above for you. –  asawyer May 3 '12 at 18:48
    
@asawyer : Thank you. Interesting. I didn't know Lazy<T> is something in .NET...nice –  BDotA May 3 '12 at 18:51
1  
Internally, Lazy<T> running under LazyThreadSafetyMode.ExecutionAndPublication uses double-checked locking. Be careful since this is easy to get wrong if you’re not familiar with the concept of cache coherence. –  Douglas May 3 '12 at 19:04
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Just pass a bool into the constructor whether or not you want the thing to run? Something like:

ClassA(bool runA)
{
    if (runA) 
    {
        ClassB.Foo();
    }
}
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This is not the right thing to do. If the caller knows whether or not the callee should execute the function, it should simply not call when the answer is not. Sending a "do something" message to an object with a note attached that says "just kidding" is really bizarre. –  Tim May 3 '12 at 19:44
1  
I assumed that he'd always want an instance of A even if that function wasn't ran (he may be setting up other class members ommitted from the example). How can you be so sure of that? –  mattytommo May 3 '12 at 19:46
    
I can't be sure of anything, but in the absence of any evidence to indicate that OP is looking for this kind of solution (i.e. OP states that they need to ensure the method is called only once, but not that they need it to be called during object creation nor that they need to be able to indicate during creation whether it should be called) I have no reason to believe they are. –  Tim May 3 '12 at 19:57
1  
Actually you can, re-read the question. The conditional logic is inside ClassA, so to assume that the callee knows whether to execute is a fair assumption. Definitely not worth a down vote :) –  mattytommo May 3 '12 at 21:35
1  
@Tim Nah I wouldn't say I'm offended, you raise a valid point :). Different people have different opinions on what warrants a down vote, me personally I will only use it if the answer either A) doesn't compile or B) isn't even remotely close to a viable solution. If you feel that this warranted a downvote, then that's fair enough :) I wouldn't say it was being rude at all. –  mattytommo May 4 '12 at 7:37
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Without any more specifics, it's hard to say, but it sounds like this method in Class B contains some sort of initialization logic. If it's something that just needs to happen the first time Class B is referenced, then you could put it in the static constructor of Class B. If the method in Class B needs to be run only when Class A is referenced, then it could be called from the static constructor of Class A. If it cannot be called until some method of Class A is called, AND it should only ever be called once from anywhere, then I would say you should check a private static variable in Class B from within the method and return immediately if it has already been called. Otherwise, as a last resort, I'd say having a private static variable in Class A would be preferable to a global.

In all of these cases, however, I'd say that you are creating global state, which is almost always indicative of a poor design. In my humble opinion, this kind of problem is just screaming the need for a bit of "dependency injection".

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