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I’m working on a reflection project, and now I’m stuck. If I have an object of “myclass” that can hold a List does anyone know how to get the type as in the code below if the property myclass.SomList is empty?

List<myclass>  myList  =  dataGenerator.getMyClasses();
lbxObjects.ItemsSource = myList; 
lbxObjects.SelectionChanged += lbxObjects_SelectionChanged;

private void lbxObjects_SelectionChanged(object sender, SelectionChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            Reflect();
        }
Private void Reflect()
{
foreach (PropertyInfo pi in lbxObjects.SelectedItem.GetType().GetProperties())
{
      switch (pi.PropertyType.Name.ToLower())
      {
       case "list`1":
           {           
            // This works if the List<T> contains one or more elements.
            Type tTemp = GetGenericType(pi.GetValue(lbxObjects.SelectedItem, null));

            // but how is it possible to get the Type if the value is null? 
            // I need to be able to create a new object of the type the generic list expect. 
            // Type type = pi.getType?? // how to get the Type of the class inside List<T>?
             break;
           }
      }
}
}
private Type GetGenericType(object obj)
        {
            if (obj != null)
            {
                Type t = obj.GetType();
                if (t.IsGenericType)
                {
                    Type[] at = t.GetGenericArguments();
                    t = at.First<Type>();
                } return t;
            }
            else
            {
                return null;
            }
        }
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by nawfal, Fox32, Pigueiras, Peter Ritchie, Sajmon May 6 '13 at 22:30

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4 Answers 4

up vote 104 down vote accepted
Type type = pi.PropertyType.PropertyType;
if(type.IsGenericType && type.GetGenericTypeDefinition()
        == typeof(List<>))
{
    Type itemType = type.GetGenericArguments()[0]; // use this...
}


More generally, to support any IList<T>, you need to check the interfaces:

foreach (Type interfaceType in type.GetInterfaces())
{
    if (interfaceType.IsGenericType &&
        interfaceType.GetGenericTypeDefinition()
        == typeof(IList<>))
    {
        Type itemType = type.GetGenericArguments()[0];
        // do something...
        break;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
6  
shouldn't it be Type itemType = interfaceType.GetGenericArguments()[0]; –  Muxa Feb 23 '10 at 8:29
    
Amusingly, the second example fails with, say IList<int>. Fix below stackoverflow.com/a/13608408/284795 –  Colonel Panic Nov 28 '12 at 15:24

Given an object which I suspect to be some kind of IList<>, how can I determine of what it's an IList<>?

Here's the gutsy solution. It assumes you have the actual object to test (rather than a Type).

public static Type ListOfWhat(Object list)
{
    return ListOfWhat2((dynamic)list);
}

private static Type ListOfWhat2<T>(IList<T> list)
{
    return typeof(T);
}

Example usage:

object value = new ObservableCollection<DateTime>();
ListOfWhat(value).Dump();

Prints

typeof(DateTime)
share|improve this answer
    
-1: Why IList<T> instead of IEnumerable<T>? Why dynamic? –  John Saunders Nov 29 '12 at 11:47
    
Did I misunderstand OP's question? The detail was unclear, so I answered the question in the title. –  Colonel Panic Nov 29 '12 at 14:21
2  
You sir, are a Wizard! I have been banging my head trying to solve an issue with a dynamic parser with a generic data structure (that can deal with singular types and Lists) and this got me on the right track. –  Steve Py Aug 29 '13 at 11:06
    
Great example of 'dynamic' usage –  Ruslan May 12 at 5:44

Given an object which I suspect to be some kind of IList<>, how can I determine of what it's an IList<>?

Here's a reliable solution. My apologies for length - C#'s introspection API makes this suprisingly difficult.

/// <summary>
/// Test if a type implements IList of T, and if so, determine T.
/// </summary>
public static bool TryListOfWhat(Type type, out Type innerType)
{
    Contract.Requires(type != null);

    var interfaceTest = new Func<Type, Type>(i => i.IsGenericType && i.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(IList<>) ? i.GetGenericArguments().Single() : null);

    innerType = interfaceTest(type);
    if (innerType != null)
    {
        return true;
    }

    foreach (var i in type.GetInterfaces())
    {
        innerType = interfaceTest(i);
        if (innerType != null)
        {
            return true;
        }
    }

    return false;
}

Example usage:

    object value = new ObservableCollection<int>();
Type innerType;
TryListOfWhat(value.GetType(), out innerType).Dump();
innerType.Dump();

Returns

True
typeof(Int32)
share|improve this answer
    
I don't see any other result as Marcs method (also with marcs i get Int32) –  Offler Dec 6 '12 at 15:41

Marc's answer is the approach I use for this, but for simplicity (and a friendlier API?) you can define a property in the collection base class if you have one such as:

public abstract class CollectionBase<T> : IList<T>
{
   ...

   public Type ElementType
   {
      get
      {
         return typeof(T);
      }
   }
}

I have found this approach useful, and is easy to understand for any newcomers to generics.

share|improve this answer
    
I wanted to use this approach but then i realized i will have to have the list instance in order to determine element type, which i will not always have. –  Muxa Feb 22 '10 at 22:04
1  
you can make the property static. Like "public static Type ElementType" ... then you get at it as "var t = CollectionBase<int>.ElementType;" ... you will not need an instance variable –  Nabheet Feb 24 '12 at 18:12
    
True. Static allows you to work with a class without an existing object. I find this approach easier to work with. Sure, you need to store additional information in your objects but at least you spare yourself from this cascade-call in the approved answer. –  rbaleksandar Jul 26 '13 at 13:42