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The following program compiles with no warnings (which is undesirable, because omitting the array index on lines 19 and 21 effectively destroys the array). If you compile with -D CHECK_NONZERO, you will see that line 23 will not compile without a warning, as the enum BBB evaluates to 1 where AAA and aaa evaluate to 0.

It appears that if an enum evaluates to 0, gcc will seamlessly cast it to a NULL pointer.

Should this be considered a bug?

EDIT: I don't think I was as clear as I could have been about what I perceive to be the issue. It seems to me there would be no harm in type-checking the enum for warning purposes before resolving the enum to its constant value, but this is not how gcc works at the moment. However, I'm not sure if this is worthy of a bug report or feature request to the gcc project.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef enum {
    AAA,
    BBB,
} alpha_e;

enum {
    aaa,
    bbb,
};

int main(void) {
    alpha_e *alpha_array = malloc(sizeof(*alpha_array) * 2);
    alpha_array[0] = AAA;
    alpha_array[1] = BBB;
    printf("1: alpha_array[0] == %u, alpha_array[1] == %u\n", alpha_array[0], alpha_array[1]);
    alpha_array = AAA;
    printf("2: alpha_array[0] == %u, alpha_array[1] == %u\n", alpha_array[0], alpha_array[1]);
    alpha_array = aaa;
#ifdef CHECK_NONZERO
    alpha_array = BBB;
#endif
    return 1;
}

gcc -v:

Using built-in specs.
Target: x86_64-linux-gnu
Configured with: ../src/configure -v --with-pkgversion='Ubuntu 4.4.3-4ubuntu5.1' --with-bugurl=file:///usr/share/doc/gcc-4.4/README.Bugs --enable-languages=c,c++,fortran,objc,obj-c++ --prefix=/usr --enable-shared --enable-multiarch --enable-linker-build-id --with-system-zlib --libexecdir=/usr/lib --without-included-gettext --enable-threads=posix --with-gxx-include-dir=/usr/include/c++/4.4 --program-suffix=-4.4 --enable-nls --enable-clocale=gnu --enable-libstdcxx-debug --enable-plugin --enable-objc-gc --disable-werror --with-arch-32=i486 --with-tune=generic --enable-checking=release --build=x86_64-linux-gnu --host=x86_64-linux-gnu --target=x86_64-linux-gnu
Thread model: posix
gcc version 4.4.3 (Ubuntu 4.4.3-4ubuntu5.1)
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2  
I'm trying to think of a context in which setting a pointer to any enum value would be a good idea and not having a lot of luck. Anyone? –  dmckee May 3 '12 at 19:20
    
While an enum with value 0 is a valid NULL pointer constant per the standard and gcc doesn't need to produce a diagnostic, it seems that it might be sensible to have a waring that can be enabled/disabled. By default VC++ 2010 produces the following warning: warning C4047: '=' : 'alpha_e *' differs in levels of indirection from 'int' –  Michael Burr May 3 '12 at 19:28

3 Answers 3

Any integral constant expression that evaluates to 0 should be considered to be a null pointer. I think an enum value is considered constant - it's not a value that you can change.

It is not legal to set a pointer to any other integer value.

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2  
Yes - an enumeration constant is an integral constant expression. –  Michael Burr May 3 '12 at 19:22
    
just don't call it NULL pointer, it is null pointer. NULL has a very specific meaning in the context of C. –  Jens Gustedt May 3 '12 at 19:43
    
gcc also accepts the following: 0, 5-5, <any variable> * 0 –  mkb May 3 '12 at 20:25
    
@JensGustedt: Thanks, fixed. –  Mark Byers May 3 '12 at 21:11

The integer literal 0 is a null pointer constant.

(C99, 6.3.2.3p3 Pointers): "An integer constant expression with the value 0, or such an expression cast to type void *, is called a null pointer constant."

int *p = 0;   // p is a null pointer

(C99, 6.3.2.3p3) "If a null pointer constant is converted to a pointer type, the resulting pointer, called a null pointer, is guaranteed to compare unequal to a pointer to any object or function."

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6.3.2.3 Pointers
...
3 An integer constant expression with the value 0, or such an expression cast to type void *, is called a null pointer constant.66) If a null pointer constant is converted to a pointer type, the resulting pointer, called a null pointer, is guaranteed to compare unequal to a pointer to any object or function.

4 Conversion of a null pointer to another pointer type yields a null pointer of that type. Any two null pointers shall compare equal.

5 An integer may be converted to any pointer type. Except as previously specified, the result is implementation-defined, might not be correctly aligned, might not point to an entity of the referenced type, and might be a trap representation.67)
...

66) The macro NULL is defined in <stddef.h> (and other headers) as a null pointer constant; see 7.19.

67) The mapping functions for converting a pointer to an integer or an integer to a pointer are intended to be consistent with the addressing structure of the execution environment.

So, not a bug.

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The question is not "is [this code] buggy" but "should [the compiler] warn about [this code]" which is a bit subjective but presumably turns on the amount of possible damage and the (non-)existence of good reasons to write such code. –  dmckee May 3 '12 at 19:37
1  
@dmckee: To me, the language above is pretty clear; no diagnostic is necessary. Enumeration constants are integer constant expressions with type int. An enumeration constant that evaluates to 0 in a pointer context is exactly the same thing as the literal 0. –  John Bode May 3 '12 at 20:55
    
@John: Indeed, if the compiler should warn about this, then it should probably also warn about things like int *p = !1; or int *z = 42-42; –  R.. May 3 '12 at 23:35

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