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The code below displays the tuples of an specific table. How can I turn this into dynamic code? So the user would enter the name of the table, then the rows and column names in addition to the content of the table are displayed.

* Keep in mind that res.getInt and res.getString need to be specified as they are. In a dynamic model, I wouldn't need to know the number, type, and name of the columns. *

public void displayTableA()
{
    //Connection already established

    Statement st = conn.createStatement();
    ResultSet res = st.executeQuery("SELECT * FROM A");
    System.out.println("A_code: " + "\t" + "A_name: ");
    while (res.next()) {
        int r = res.getInt("A_code");
        String s = res.getString("A_name");
        System.out.println(r + "\t\t" + s);
    }
    conn.close();  
}
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3  
Bad idea, unless you really know what you're doing and understand the security risks. –  Matt Fenwick May 3 '12 at 19:17
    
I know. I just need to do this. There are way too many tables to hardcode. –  Nu Gnoj Mik May 3 '12 at 19:20
    
@MarlonBrando So, you know you have one 'int' column and one 'String' column, but don't know how they are called? –  Angelo Neuschitzer May 3 '12 at 19:31

3 Answers 3

Direct answer: The query is just a string. You can build it up from user inputs. Like read the name of the table into a variable, say "String tablename", then

String query="select * from " + tablename;

Then you run the query to get the result set:

ResultSet rs=st.executeQuery(query);

Then get the meta data for the result set:

ResultSetMetaData meta=rs.getMetaData();

Then loop through the columns getting their names:

for (int x=1;x<=meta.getColumnCount();++x)
{
  String columnName=meta.getColumnName(x);
  ... do whatever you want with this column name ...
}

(Note the columns are numbered starting from 1, not 0.)

As to the data itself, if you're just dumping it out, you don't need to know the type. Just do getString on everything. Every data type can be converted to a string. Well, if you have blobs or images you might want to check for those. There's a ResultSetMetaData function to get the column type, I think it's getType or something like that. Check the javadocs.

That said, why do you want to do this? If you're building some sort of tool to be used by developers to do ad hoc queries, okay fine. But I would be extremely cautious about exposing something like this to end users. (a) They would be unlikely to understand the data, and (b) You'd be creating a huge security hole, users could see ANY data in the system. You could potentially wrap this in checks to limit the users to what they're authorized to see, but it's a lot of work to get that right. It's a lot easier to say "here's what you are allowed to see" then to try to say "here's what you're not allowed to see".

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^ Its done only for unimportant tables –  Nu Gnoj Mik May 3 '12 at 19:31
    
I suppose you could check the table name against a list of "no restriction" tables. But bear in mind that when you build queries from user inputs, you have to be careful about SQL injection attacks. Like suppose you built the query like I show above with no security checks. Someone could enter a table name of "foobar; delete from accounts_payable;" Then he wipes out your payables table. –  Jay May 3 '12 at 19:34
public void displayTable(String table)
{
    //Connection already established

    Statement st = conn.createStatement();
    ResultSet res = st.executeQuery("SELECT * FROM " + table);
    ResultSetMetaData rsmd = res.getMetaData();
    while (res.next()) {
        for(int ii = 1; ii <= rsmd.getColumnCount(); ii++) {
            // get type
            int type = rsmt.getColumnType(ii);
            String value = null;
            switch (type) {
                case Types.VARCHAR: value = res.getString(ii); break;
            }
            // print value.
            System.out.print(rsmd.getColumnName(ii) + ": " + value);
        }
    }
    conn.close();  
}
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I wouldnt know the names of the columns. So i cant use res.getInt("A_code") and res.getString("A_name"); –  Nu Gnoj Mik May 3 '12 at 19:25
    
sorry I commited too soon, see my edit. (The important thing is the ResultSetMetaData) –  Angelo Neuschitzer May 3 '12 at 19:26

If you want print a ResultSet in a dynamic query converting a instance of ResultSet in String:

public static String toString(ResultSet rs) throws SQLException {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    ResultSetMetaData metaData = rs.getMetaData();
    int columnCount = metaData.getColumnCount();
    Map<Integer, Integer> sizeMap = new HashMap<>();
    for (int column = 1; column <= columnCount; column++) {
        int size = Math.max(metaData.getColumnDisplaySize(column), metaData.getColumnName(column).length());
        sizeMap.put(column, size);
        sb.append(StringUtils.rightPad(metaData.getColumnName(column), size));
        sb.append(' ');
        sb.append(' ');
    }
    sb.append('\n');
    for (int column = 1; column <= columnCount; column++) {
        sb.append(StringUtils.rightPad("", sizeMap.get(column), '-'));
        sb.append(' ');
        sb.append(' ');
    }
    while(rs.next()) {
        sb.append('\n');
        for (int columnIndex = 1; columnIndex <= columnCount; columnIndex++) {
            String str = rs.getString(columnIndex);
            if (str == null) {
                str = "(null)";
            }
            sb.append(StringUtils.rightPad(str, sizeMap.get(columnIndex)));
            sb.append(' ');
            sb.append(' ');
        }
    }
    return sb.toString();
}

For print something like that:

user_id       user_code             date_update          
------------  --------------------  -------------------  
01006393      00989573              2011-09-29 19:23:46  
00984742      20192498              2011-12-21 00:00:00

This method use Commons Lang 3

Note: You should use this with care for avoid memory errors. You can change the sb.append with System.out.print or System.out.println

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