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Question:

I want to untar a tarfile which has many tar files within itself and remove the files in all the tar files and I want all of these processes to run in parallel in Unix bash scripting.

Conditions:

  1. The script should return an error if any untar/remove process has any error.
  2. It should only return success after all N (untar and remove) processes complete successfully.

Proposed solution:

 mkdir a
 tar -C a -xvf b.tar
 cd a
 for i in *
 do
 rm -r $i &
 done
share|improve this question
2  
What's your question? – Burton Samograd May 3 '12 at 20:58
    
Is my solution right? and right now, im not getting the exit status of the background processes. – beck03076 May 3 '12 at 21:00
    
I want to implement this, "As you launch each background process, save $! which is the pid of the background process. After you launch all process you will have all the pid's. Now one by one wait for each pid, with "wait $pid". ."... how to implement that? – beck03076 May 3 '12 at 21:02
1  
See answer below. – Burton Samograd May 3 '12 at 21:08
    
Please do not mangle a question beyond recognition after you get an answer. – Jonathan Leffler May 4 '12 at 2:10
up vote 1 down vote accepted
mkdir a
tar -C a -xvf b.tar
 cd a
 success=$(for i in *
 do
 rm -r $i || echo failed & # if a job fails false will be echoed
 done
 wait)
 # if any of the jobs failed, success will be set to a value other than ""
 [[ -z "$success" ]] && exit 0 || exit 1
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Burton!, what sense does this make?. Am i understanding this the right way?. Instead of creating one process "rm *", im creating n number of processes in parallel and removing files to save time. is that right? – beck03076 May 3 '12 at 21:12
    
Actually, now that I think about it this won't work. The variable will be set in a subshell. I'll do an edit that does work. – Burton Samograd May 3 '12 at 21:21
    
ok, i will wait!!! – beck03076 May 3 '12 at 21:23
    
That should work. – Burton Samograd May 3 '12 at 21:24
1  
Yes, using & casuses the process to run in the background, so you are removing every file in the directory a in parallel. This is not a good way to do it though; I suggest looking at xargs with the -P option: cd a && { ls * | xargs -P 4 rm -r; } which will run 4 task in parallel. – Burton Samograd May 3 '12 at 21:27

If you have GNU Parallel http://www.gnu.org/software/parallel/ installed you can do this:

tar xvf foo.tgz | perl -ne 'print $l;$l=$_;END{print $l}' | parallel rm

It is useful if you do not have space to extract the full tar.gz file, but you need to process files as you unpack them:

tar xvf foo.tgz | perl -ne 'print $l;$l=$_;END{print $l}' | parallel do_stuff {}\; rm {}

You can install GNU Parallel simply by:

wget http://git.savannah.gnu.org/cgit/parallel.git/plain/src/parallel
chmod 755 parallel
cp parallel sem

Watch the intro videos for GNU Parallel to learn more: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL284C9FF2488BC6D1

share|improve this answer
    
Nice that you answer down voted questions. Thanks – beck03076 May 9 '12 at 22:03

The answer tar xvf a.tar | tac | xargs -P 4 rm -rv is inspired from Burton Samograd's comment about xargs -P

$ mkdir -p a/b/c/d
mkdir: created directory `a'
mkdir: created directory `a/b'
mkdir: created directory `a/b/c'
mkdir: created directory `a/b/c/d'

$ touch a/1 a/2 a/3 a/b/4 a/b/5

$ tar cf a.tar a

$ rm -rfv a
removed directory: `a/b/c/d'
removed directory: `a/b/c'
removed `a/b/4'
removed `a/b/5'
removed directory: `a/b'
removed `a/3'
removed `a/1'
removed `a/2'
removed directory: `a'

$ tar xvf a.tar | tac | xargs -P 4 rm -rv
removed `a/2'
removed `a/1'
removed `a/3'
removed `a/b/5'
removed `a/b/4'
removed directory: `a/b/c/d'
removed directory: `a/b/c'
removed directory: `a/b'
removed directory: `a'
share|improve this answer

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