Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Ok I really would like to know how expert MVVM developers handle an openfile dialog in WPF.

I don't really want to do this in my ViewModel(where 'Browse' is referenced via a DelegateCommand)

void Browse(object param)
{
    //Add code here
    OpenFileDialog d = new OpenFileDialog();

    if (d.ShowDialog() == true)
    {
        //Do stuff
    }
}

Because I believe that goes against MVVM methodology.

What do I do?

share|improve this question
    
See blog post of Ollie Riches <awkwardcoder.blogspot.nl/2012/03/…; where is explained how to pass messages in WPF with a clean separation of the View & ViewModel. –  amutter Apr 24 '13 at 10:04

5 Answers 5

up vote 22 down vote accepted

The best thing to do here is use a service.

A service is just a class that you access from a central repository of services, often an IOC container. The service then implements what you need like the OpenFileDialog.

So, assuming you have an IFileDialogService in a Unity container, you could do...

void Browse(object param)
{
    var fileDialogService = container.Resolve<IFileDialogService>();

    string path = fileDialogService.OpenFileDialog();

    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(path))
    {
        //Do stuff
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
How do you tell the XAML to use this service? –  Sheik Yerbouti Jan 25 '12 at 17:34
1  
Depending on your MVVM framework you can use a command, or an action to execute code based on a button click or some other event. –  Cameron MacFarland Jan 26 '12 at 14:16
3  
Is there any way to specify the window that owns the dialog? –  Collin K Jul 19 '13 at 20:12
    
@CameronMacFarland I am a bit slow, can you please show me the example of the interface and how it is being called in the modelviewer? –  Haikal Nashuha Jan 14 at 6:17

I use a service which i for example can pass into the constructor of my viewModel or resolve via dependency injection. e.g.

public interface IOpenFileService
{
    string FileName { get; }
    bool OpenFileDialog()
}

and a class implementing it, using OpenFileDialog under the hood. In the viewModel, i only use the interface and thus can mock/replace it if needed.

share|improve this answer
1  
My only problem with instance properties on services is what about if two threads call OpenFileDialog at the same time? Not really an issue for file dialogs but can be an issue for other types of services. –  Cameron MacFarland Jun 25 '09 at 14:43
1  
With dependency injection containers, you can usually register it so that each time the service is resolved, a new instance is created. So you could create a new service, use it and throw it away after that. Or, you only use the OpenFileDialog() method and let it return a string, or null if it was aborted. –  Botz3000 Jun 25 '09 at 14:50
1  
While this is true, I agree with Cameron's assessment here. You run the risk of unintended side-effects with the property approach. I know that this is the same pattern that the .NET Framework uses, but this isn't necessarily an argument for this pattern, just that it exists. I prefer the use of checking for null in the return value to indicate a failure of some sort (or user hitting "Cancel"). –  Anderson Imes Nov 29 '09 at 20:46

I would have liked to comment on one of the answers, but alas, my reputation is not high enough to do so.

Having a call such as OpenFileDialog() violates the MVVM pattern because it implies a view (dialog) in the view model. The view model can call something like GetFileName() (that is, if simple binding is not sufficient), but it should not care how the file name is obtained.

share|improve this answer

Having a service is like opening up a view from viewmodel. I have a Dependency property in view, and on the chnage of the property, I open up FileDialog and read the path, update the property and consequently the bound property of the VM

share|improve this answer

The ViewModel should not open dialogs or even know of their existence. If the VM is housed in a separate DLL, the project should not have a reference to PresentationFramework.

I like to use a helper class in the view for common dialogs.

The helper class exposes a command (not an event) which the window binds to in XAML. This implies the use of RelayCommand within the view. The helper class is a DepencyObject so it can bind to the view model.

class DialogHelper : DependencyObject
{
    public ViewModel ViewModel
    {
        get { return (ViewModel)GetValue(ViewModelProperty); }
        set { SetValue(ViewModelProperty, value); }
    }

    public static readonly DependencyProperty ViewModelProperty =
        DependencyProperty.Register("ViewModel", typeof(ViewModel), typeof(DialogHelper),
        new UIPropertyMetadata(new PropertyChangedCallback(ViewModelProperty_Changed)));

    private static void ViewModelProperty_Changed(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (ViewModelProperty != null)
        {
            Binding myBinding = new Binding("FileName");
            myBinding.Source = e.NewValue;
            myBinding.Mode = BindingMode.OneWayToSource;
            BindingOperations.SetBinding(d, FileNameProperty, myBinding);
        }
    }

    private string FileName
    {
        get { return (string)GetValue(FileNameProperty); }
        set { SetValue(FileNameProperty, value); }
    }

    private static readonly DependencyProperty FileNameProperty =
        DependencyProperty.Register("FileName", typeof(string), typeof(DialogHelper),
        new UIPropertyMetadata(new PropertyChangedCallback(FileNameProperty_Changed)));

    private static void FileNameProperty_Changed(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        Debug.WriteLine("DialogHelper.FileName = {0}", e.NewValue);
    }

    public ICommand OpenFile { get; private set; }

    public DialogHelper()
    {
        OpenFile = new RelayCommand(OpenFileAction);
    }

    private void OpenFileAction(object obj)
    {
        OpenFileDialog dlg = new OpenFileDialog();

        if (dlg.ShowDialog() == true)
        {
            FileName = dlg.FileName;
        }
    }
}

The helper class needs a reference to the ViewModel instance. See the resource dictionary. Just after construction, the ViewModel property is set (in the same line of XAML). This is when the FileName property on the helper class is bound to the FileName property on the view model.

<Window x:Class="DialogExperiment.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        xmlns:local="clr-namespace:DialogExperiment"
        xmlns:vm="clr-namespace:DialogExperimentVM;assembly=DialogExperimentVM"
        Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">
    <Window.Resources>
        <vm:ViewModel x:Key="viewModel" />
        <local:DialogHelper x:Key="helper" ViewModel="{StaticResource viewModel}"/>
    </Window.Resources>
    <DockPanel DataContext="{StaticResource viewModel}">
        <Menu DockPanel.Dock="Top">
            <MenuItem Header="File">
                <MenuItem Header="Open" Command="{Binding Source={StaticResource helper}, Path=OpenFile}" />
            </MenuItem>
        </Menu>
    </DockPanel>
</Window>
share|improve this answer
    
Just curious, (I'm still learning WPF), why didn't you make the "public ICommand OpenFile { get; private set; }" a dependency property? I'm having a hard time knowing when to make something a dependency property and when it's just ok to have it a plain .Net object. –  EbbnFlow Jun 9 at 13:47
1  
Either would work, but CLR properties are lighter weight so I prefer them where possible. It's not a big deal though. Remember that the object that you are binding TO may be a plain CLR property. (But of course the thing that you are binding FROM must be a DP, which is why FileName is a DP.) –  Ima Dirty Troll Jun 9 at 19:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.