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Say I have a file called settings.py and it's content is the following:

{
    "translate_tabs_to_spaces": True,
    "word_wrap": "true",
    "font_face": "Monaco",
    "font_size": 14.0,
    "highlight_line": True,
    "ignored_packages":
    [
        ""
    ],
    "what": '''
            This is python file, not json
            '''
}

How can I get it into a dict called settings in my main app file app.py?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
2  
Why not use JSON? Python has a json module that makes it incredibly easy to decode JSON data. It also avoids the nasty side effects of loading unverified python code that has been mentioned in the comments of some of the answers. –  Mike May 3 '12 at 21:31
    
@Michael Because I want to use ''' ... ''' –  Adam Silver May 3 '12 at 21:40
    
Can you add an example to the question? –  Mike May 3 '12 at 21:48
    
In tripple quoted string I won't need to escape anything if I use Python, I'll have a mess with json if I want to write the setting file by hand with a lot of " and ' in string literal. Please correct me if I am wrong. –  Adam Silver May 3 '12 at 22:01
1  
In that case maybe you want to write your settings file as a INI file and load it using ConfigParser. IMHO INI files are more human-readable. –  Mike May 3 '12 at 22:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can use ast.literal_eval() to do this safely.

import ast

data="""\
{
    "translate_tabs_to_spaces": True,
    "word_wrap": "true",
    "font_face": "Monaco",
    "font_size": 14.0,
    "highlight_line": True,
    "ignored_packages":
    [
        ""
    ],
    "what": '''
            This is python file, not json
            '''
}\
"""

print(ast.literal_eval(data))

Giving us:

{'what': '\n            This is python file, not json\n            ', 'font_size': 14.0, 'translate_tabs_to_spaces': True, 'font_face': 'Monaco', 'word_wrap': 'true', 'highlight_line': True, 'ignored_packages': ['']}

Edit:

Given the new comment from the asker that suggests that he wants to be able to use ... in his config, ast.literal_eval() will not be suitable, as it can't handle ellipses. It's not quite clear if this is what he meant, and this is still a good answer to the question that was asked.

Turns out the asker was talking about triple quoted strings, which are handled by this correctly.

share|improve this answer
    
Why did I get down-voted on this? –  Lattyware May 3 '12 at 21:25
1  
-1 No need of literal eval, just import the module and get all python freebies –  Anurag Uniyal May 3 '12 at 21:26
    
I think you've misunderstood the question. The name of the file is settings.py. It's a python file, and it sounds like it's part of a package written by the author. This isn't random untrusted text from an unknown user. –  senderle May 3 '12 at 21:26
2  
I'm sorry, by that paranoid logic we should be using ast to do all imports that it can handle instead of importing directly. That doesn't make any sense to me. If someone has access to settings.py then they also have access to the rest of the source. They can do whatever they want; ast.literal_eval won't keep them out at that point. –  senderle May 3 '12 at 21:43
1  
@Lattyware I agree with senderie that if an attacker can compromise your settings file then your whole source code base is also compromised. –  cobie May 3 '12 at 21:52

Why not name that dict say settings and than just import it from settings.py e.g.

settings.py

settings = {} # fill with your data

use it like this

>>> from settings import settings
>>> print settings
{}

Alternate solutions is to just add variables at settings module level and use them directly, why you need a dict? e.g.

settings.py

translate_tabs_to_spaces = True
# more settings

use it like this

>>> import settings
>>> settings.translate_tabs_to_spaces
True
share|improve this answer
    
-1, This is dangerous - it could contain malicious code. It also requires changing the data file. –  Lattyware May 3 '12 at 21:24
1  
@Lattyware really, OP hasn't told the how settings.py is created, may be it is just a settings file as used in django –  Anurag Uniyal May 3 '12 at 21:25
    
why another downvote explain please? –  Anurag Uniyal May 3 '12 at 21:53
2  
@Lattyware i don't really see anything dangerous in this approach. if the dict is not named its less dangerous? to me this is the right way to do it. who makes a file with a dict in there without naming it to a variable? –  aschmid00 May 3 '12 at 21:59
    
@aschmid00 The problem is you can put any code into this file and it will be run if you import it. And as to a who puts a dict into a file without naming it, well, someone writing a settings file. Most settings files don't begin with settings = { .... –  Lattyware May 3 '12 at 22:01

Give the settings dict a name in the settings module then import the settings module into your module and load it into a variable like

import settings
your_settings = settings.settings_dict
share|improve this answer
    
Will this work? I don't see a settings_dict object defined. –  Mike May 3 '12 at 21:23
    
-1, This is dangerous - it could contain malicious code. It also requires changing the data file. –  Lattyware May 3 '12 at 21:23
    
if you are using a settings module then it most definitely is written by you I would guess –  cobie May 3 '12 at 21:25
1  
@Lattyware really, OP hasn't told the how settings.py is created, may be it is just a settings file as used in django –  Anurag Uniyal May 3 '12 at 21:25
    
I'm not saying it's likely, but why introduce that risk? If a user blindly copy/pastes a settings file, why let them potentially introduce something malicious. –  Lattyware May 3 '12 at 21:26

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