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I have non-consecutive, but ordered numeric identifiers. I would like to get consecutive values.

Current Table:

original_value

1
1
1
3
3
29
29
29
29
1203
1203
5230304
5230304
5230304
5230304

Desired Table:

original_value   desired_value

1                1
1                1
1                1
3                2
3                2
29               3
29               3
29               3
29               3
1203             4
1203             4
5230304          5
5230304          5
5230304          5
5230304          5
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1  
Do you want a query that shows you the consecutive values, or do you want to update the current values with the consecutive values? –  Bohemian May 3 '12 at 21:54
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Another approach, sans joining:

select

  original_value,
  case when @original = original_value then
    @group_number
  else
    @group_number := @group_number + 1
  end,
  (@original := original_value) as x

from tbl,(select @original := null, @group_number := 0) z
order by original_value

Live test: http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!2/b82d6/6

If you want to remove calculations in result, table-derive the query:

select w.original_value, w.group_number
from
(
  select

    original_value,
    case when @original = original_value then
      @group_number
    else
      @group_number := @group_number + 1      
    end as group_number,
    (@original := original_value) as x

  from tbl,(select @original := null, @group_number := 0) z
  order by original_value
) w

Live test: http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!2/b82d6/4

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Aggregate your values, use row number to get your desired value, then join back to your original values:

SELECT t.original, sq.desired
FROM Table t
INNER JOIN(
  SELECT ssq.original, @rownum:=@rownum+1 ‘desired’
  FROM (
    SELECT t.original
    FROM Table t
    GROUP BY t.original
    ORDER BY t.original
  ) ssq,
  (SELECT @rownum:=0) r 
) sq ON sq.original = t.original
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Yet another approach, this one simulating DENSE_RANK with joins:

    SELECT t.original, d.derived
      FROM t
INNER JOIN (    SELECT t.original, COUNT(DISTINCT t1.original) AS "derived"
                  FROM t
            INNER JOIN t t1
                       ON t.original >= t1.original
              GROUP BY 1) d
           ON t.original = d.original
  ORDER BY t.original;
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See this post why re-COUNTing from the start is bad sqlblog.com/blogs/adam_machanic/archive/2006/07/12/… –  Michael Buen May 4 '12 at 4:12
    
@MichaelBuen, yes, this answer is merely correct rather than correct and efficient. :) –  pilcrow May 4 '12 at 4:14
    
You suggest an answer you yourself will also use in production? Is it? ;-) –  Michael Buen May 4 '12 at 4:16
    
He was merely offering "yet another approach"... give him a break. Thanks for contributing @pilcrow –  Kroehre May 4 '12 at 20:21
    
Oh, I don't mind — and he's right to be cautious. This approach works well on a few hundred records. I tried it on 5.5M records (600k records repeated 1 – 10 times each), however. Very, very slow. –  pilcrow May 4 '12 at 20:33
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If I understand you correctly:

select 
    original_value, 
    dense_rank() over (order by original_value) as desired_value
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+1 for the best technique, but -1 because MySQL doesn't support this. :) –  pilcrow May 4 '12 at 11:52
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