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Say I'm trying to execute this JavaScript snippet. Assume the undeclared vars and methods are declared elsewhere, above, and that something and somethingElse evaluate to boolean-true.

try {
    if(something) {
        var magicVar = -1;
    }

    if(somethingElse) {
        magicFunction(magicVar);
    }
} catch(e) {
    doSomethingWithError(e);
}

My question is: what is the scope of magicVar and is it okay to pass it into magicFunction as I've done?

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It seems to me like this is just a question about variable scope, not variable scope within a try block. –  Walter Roman Nov 4 at 19:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Javascript has function scope. That means that magicvar will exist from the beginning of the function it's declared in all the way to the end of that function, even if that statement doesn't ever execute. This is called variable hoisting. The same thing happens with functions declarations, which in turn is called function hoisting.

If the variable is declared in global scope, it will be visible to everything. This is part of the reason why global variables are considered evil in Javascript.

Your example will pass undefined into magicFunction if something is false, because magicVar hasn't been assigned to anything.

While this is technically valid Javascript, it's generally considered bad style and will not pass style checkers like jsLint. Extremely unintuitive Javascript like this will execute without any error

alert(a); //alerts "undefined"
var a;

POP QUIZ: What does the following code do?

(function() {
  x = 2;
  var x;
  alert(x);
})();
alert(x);
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1  
The example you gave isn't quite good because it was undefined anyway, because window.a is undefined –  gdoron May 4 '12 at 2:22
    
@gdoron I'm not sure I see what you're getting at. If you just try to run alert(a) all by itself, it will throw an error like a is 'undefined'. –  Peter Olson May 4 '12 at 2:30
    
The thing is that a can be undefined because it undefined in outerscope. Take a look on this demo If you remove the var x you still get the same result. –  gdoron May 4 '12 at 2:35
1  
@gdoron I still don't understand what you're getting at. My point is that this code will run without errors, whereas this code will throw an error. –  Peter Olson May 4 '12 at 2:38
    
Alert two then throw an error? (if x wasn't defined in outerscope) –  gdoron May 4 '12 at 2:40
  • In javascript only functions create a new context -closure.
  • Every definition of a variable is really a declaration of the variable at the top of its scope and an assignment at the place where the definition is.

var

  • function-scoped
  • hoist to the top of its function
  • redeclarations of the same name in the same scope are no-ops

You may want to read MDN scope cheat sheet

Due to hoisting You can even do things like this:

function bar() {
    var x = "outer";

    function foo() {
        alert(x); // {undefined} Doesn't refer to the outerscope x
        // Due the the var hoising next:        
        x = 'inner';
        var x;
        alert(x); // inner

    }
    foo();
}

bar();​

bar();​

Demo

So the foo function is converted to something like this:

function foo() {
    var x;
    alert(x); // {undefined} Doesn't refer to the outerscope x
    // Due the the var hoising next:        
    x = 'inner';
    alert(x); // inner
}​

My question is: what is the scope of magicVar and is it okay to pass it into magicFunction as I've done?

Define okay..., Yes the code is valid, but it's less readable then if the variables declarations were on the top, that's all.

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I'm torn! I love both yours and Peter Olson's. Have an upvote :) –  Darren Green May 4 '12 at 2:16
    
@DarrenGreen. :) Don't feel bad. Just pick the best answer you think you got. (I don't like the Stackoverflow idea that accepted answers pops to the top {did I hear hoisting? :)}, it doesn't make sense that the guy which probably has the less knowledge on the question decide which answer is the best.) If it's Peter's answer I'm cool with it, I don't compete with out answers. –  gdoron May 4 '12 at 2:20

With var, variables exist from the beginning of the function to the end of it, no matter where they are declared, or even if the statement is actually ever reached. They will, however, be undefined until they are assigned another value.

So in your case, if something is false but somethingelse is true, you will call magicFunction with its first argument being undefined.

The let keyword, created in Javascript 1.9 and available (as of today, May 3rd 2012, and as far as I know) only in Firefox, declares variables with the scoped semantics you're probably used to.

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Due to javascript "hoisting" (google it), your variable declaration code gets translated as:

function yourFunction() {
  var magicVar;
  try {
      if(something) {
          magicVar = -1;
      }

      if(somethingElse) {
          magicFunction(magicVar);
      }
  } catch(e) {
      doSomethingWithError(e);
  }

} //end of your function

"Hoisting" moves all variables declarations to the top of the function. So magicVar is available everywhere in the function, but it's undefined until you give it a value.

Your variable has function scope.

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