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Error:

Unhandled Exception: System.Data.SqlClient.SqlException: The operation failed because an index or statistics with name 'IX_ID' already exists on table 'PrivateMakeUpLessons'.

Model (Simplified, building in a separate test project for debugging):

public abstract class Lesson
{
    public Guid ID { get; set; }
    public string Room { get; set; }
    public TimeSpan Time { get; set; }
    public int Duration { get; set; }
}

public abstract class RecurringLesson : Lesson
{
    public int DayOfWeek { get; set; }
    public DateTime StartDate { get; set; }
    public DateTime EndDate { get; set; }
    public string Frequency { get; set; }
}

public class PrivateLesson : RecurringLesson
{
    public string Student { get; set; }
    public string Teacher { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Cancellation> Cancellations { get; set; }
}

public class Cancellation
{
    public Guid ID { get; set; }
    public DateTime Date { get; set; }
    public virtual PrivateLesson Lesson { get; set; }
    public virtual MakeUpLesson MakeUpLesson { get; set; }
}

public class MakeUpLesson : Lesson
{
    public DateTime Date { get; set; }
    public string Teacher { get; set; }
    public virtual Cancellation Cancellation { get; set; }
}

Configuration:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    modelBuilder.Entity<Lesson>().ToTable("Lessons");
    modelBuilder.Entity<RecurringLesson>().ToTable("RecurringLessons");
    modelBuilder.Entity<PrivateLesson>().ToTable("PrivateLessons");
    modelBuilder.Entity<MakeUpLesson>().ToTable("PrivateMakeUpLessons");

    modelBuilder.Entity<Cancellation>()
        .HasOptional(x => x.MakeUpLesson)
        .WithRequired(x => x.Cancellation);

    base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);
}

Notes:

This worked fine in EF 4.2. Is there something wrong with my model? The actual model is much more complicated which is why I have all the classes abstracted out. Also, I am working against an existing database so I need to use Table-Per-Type inheritance.

If I change the relationship of Cancellation to PrivateMakeUpLesson from 1 to 0..1 to 0..1 to 0..1 it works. This is undesirable because you can't have a PrivateMakeUpLesson without a Cancellation.

Also, if I make PrivateMakeUpLesson NOT inherit from Lesson then it also works, but it IS a lesson and needs to remain so for existing business logic.

I'd appreciate any guidance. Thank you!

Edit:

Starting a bounty. I can't find any documentation on what changed between EF 4.2 and EF 4.3 with regard to the index generation for code first. It's clear that EF 4.3 is creating more indexes and that the naming scheme has changed but I want to know if there's a bug in EF or if there is something fundamentally wrong with my model or fluent API configuration.

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2  
You mentioned that you are using existing database but this error looks more like EF is trying to create and index - that happens only when EF modifies database schema. Are you using EF migrations? –  Ladislav Mrnka May 4 '12 at 7:57
    
@LadislavMrnka No I am still writing the migration script manually. I just mentioned that I already have a database in production so I don't want to change the inheritance mapping method. –  Lucifer Sam May 4 '12 at 13:15
    
i agree that this sounds like its trying to recreate the database have you disabled the recreation conventions for your database since you are using a custom migration script ? –  Chris McGrath May 10 '12 at 17:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

As of EF 4.3, indexes are added for freign key columns during database creation. There is a bug that can cause an index to be created more than once. This will be fixed in a future EF release.

Until then, you can work around the issue by creating your database using Migrations instead of database initializers (or the Database.Create() method).

After generating the initial migration, you will need to delete the redundant call to Index().

CreateTable(
    "dbo.PrivateMakeUpLessons",
    c => new
        {
            ID = c.Guid(nullable: false),
            ...
        })
    .PrimaryKey(t => t.ID)
    .ForeignKey("dbo.Lessons", t => t.ID)
    .ForeignKey("dbo.Cancellations", t => t.ID)
    .Index(t => t.ID)
    .Index(t => t.ID); // <-- Remove this

To continue creating your database at run-time, you can use the MigrateDatabaseToLatestVersion initializer.

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Thanks for the workaround! Will the bug be fixed in EF 5.0? Or a later release? –  Slauma May 14 '12 at 22:46
    
Thanks for taking the time to look in to this and posting the workaround. I haven't even looked at EF migrations yet so I guess this is a great reason to take some time to check it out. –  Lucifer Sam May 15 '12 at 2:07
    
@Slauma, currently it's looking like this will be fixed in the RTM release of EF 5.0.0 –  bricelam May 15 '12 at 15:28
1  
@jerone, thanks for pointing this out! We fixed a similar issue where duplicate indexes were being created, but this specific case got missed. I've filed Work Item 1035 to make sure this one gets fixed too. –  bricelam Apr 12 '13 at 17:50
1  
Just added a comment to the Work Item 1035 showing that it can also produce duplicated Foreign Keys if using subtypes and TPH inheritance. –  Henrique Miranda Oct 28 '13 at 14:09

I got a very similar error to this one in my code a while back. Try putting the cancellation list inside the Lesson class. That's what solved my problem.

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Unfortunately this isn't a solution for me as there are actually different types of cancellations for different types of lessons. I simplified the model here in order to make it easier to understand. –  Lucifer Sam May 12 '12 at 16:52

Below I describe 2 scenarios what is probably going wrong. Please read in depth by clicking the links I provided to know more about my explanation.


First
Lesson and RecurringLesson are abstract classes (so you want to have it as the base classes).
You are creating a table of the Lesson and the RecurringLesson entities which will result in a Table per hierarchy structure. brief description
Creating a class of the base table will result in one big table which contains the columns of all inherited tables. So all properties of PrivateLesson, MakeUpLesson and all others inherited entities will be stored in the Lessons table. EF will add also a Discriminator column. The value of this column defaults to the persistent class name (like "PrivateLesson" or "MakeUpLesson") only the column matching to that particular entity (matching the Discriminator value) will be used in that particular row.

BUT
You are also mapping the inherited classes like PrivateLesson and MakeUpLesson. This will force EF to use the Table per Type structure which results in one table per class. This can cause conflicts you are facing right now.


Second
Your example shows you have an one-to-one relationship (Cancellation -> MakeUpLesson) and a one-to-many relationship (Cancellation -> PrivateLesson) because PrivateLesson and MakeUpLessonare both (indirect) inherited from Lesson in combination with the first described scenario can cause problems because it will result in 2 foreign key relationships in the database per entity. (one using Table per hierarchy structure and one using the Table per Type structure).

Also this post can help you defining a correct one-to-one definition.


Please verify by performing the following steps:
I assume you have your own test environment so you can create new test databases

1. Delete the relationships to the Cancellation by commenting out all properties to this class:

public class PrivateLesson : RecurringLesson
{
    public string Student { get; set; }
    public string Teacher { get; set; }
    //public virtual ICollection<Cancellation> Cancellations { get; set; }
}

public class Cancellation
{
    public Guid ID { get; set; }
    public DateTime Date { get; set; }
    //public virtual PrivateLesson Lesson { get; set; }
    //public virtual MakeUpLesson MakeUpLesson { get; set; }
}

public class MakeUpLesson : Lesson
{
    public DateTime Date { get; set; }
    public string Teacher { get; set; }
    //public virtual Cancellation Cancellation { get; set; }
}

And remove the configuration to it:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    modelBuilder.Entity<Lesson>().ToTable("Lessons");
    modelBuilder.Entity<RecurringLesson>().ToTable("RecurringLessons");
    modelBuilder.Entity<PrivateLesson>().ToTable("PrivateLessons");
    modelBuilder.Entity<MakeUpLesson>().ToTable("PrivateMakeUpLessons");

    //modelBuilder.Entity<Cancellation>()
    //    .HasOptional(x => x.MakeUpLesson)
    //    .WithRequired(x => x.Cancellation);

    base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);
}

2. Create a new empty database
3. Let EF generate the table structure for you in this empty database.
4. Verify the first scenario. If that's true this need to be fixed first by using the Table per hierarchy structure OR the Table per Type structure. Probably you want to use the Table per hierarchy structure because (if I understand your question well) there is already an production environment.

share|improve this answer
    
"This will force EF to use the Table per Type structure which results in one table per class. This can cause conflicts you are facing right now." -- I don't understand how using TPT is causing a problem. I mentioned in my question that this is the inheritance strategy that I wanted to use. It works fine in EF 4.2 so I don't understand why using TPT with my domain model is a poor choice. –  Lucifer Sam May 12 '12 at 16:56
    
TPT isn't a poor choise but if EF uses both structures at the same time, you will get conflicts. For example if you have class Side : Base. If EF use TPH you will get one table [Base] with all columns of Base and Side. If you have at the same time the TPT structure, then you have also all columns of side listed in a [Side] table. I prefer TPT as you used already. But EF supports two ways of saving inherited entities in database –  hwcverwe May 14 '12 at 7:12

In my opinion this is clearly a bug.

The problem starts with the observation that EF creates an index IX_ID at all. If you strip down the model to the following...

public abstract class Lesson
{
    public Guid ID { get; set; }
}

public class RecurringLesson : Lesson
{
}

public class MyContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Lesson> Lessons { get; set; }

    protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        modelBuilder.Entity<RecurringLesson>().ToTable("RecurringLessons");
    }
}

... and let EF create the database schema you get two tables Lessons and RecurringLessons as expected for a TPT inheritance mapping. But I am wondering why it creates two indices for the table RecurringLessons:

  • Index PK_RecurringLessons (clustered, unique) with Index column ID
  • Index IX_ID (not clustered, not unique) with Index column ID again

I don't know if there is any benefit for the database to have a second index on the same column. But for my understanding it doesn't make sense 1) to create an index on the same column that is already covered in the PK clustered index, and 2) to create a not unique index on a column which is the primary key and therefore necessarily unique.

Moreover due to the one-to-one relationship EF tries to create an index on the table of the dependent of this association which is PrivateMakeUpLessons. (It's the dependent (and not the principal) because Cancellation is required in entity MakeUpLesson.)

ID is the foreign key in this association (and primary key at the same time because one-to-one relationships are always shared primary key associations in Entity Framework). EF apparently always creates a index on the foreign key of a relationship. But for one-to-many relationships this is not a problem because the FK column is different from the PK column. Not so for one-to-one relatonships: The FK and PK are the same (that is ID), hence EF tries to create an index IX_ID for this one-to-one relationship which already exists due to the TPT inheritance mapping (which leads to a one-to-one relationship as well from database perspective).

The same consideration as above applies here: The table PrivateMakeUpLessons has a clustered PK index on column ID. Why is a second index IX_ID on the same column required at all?

In addition EF doesn't seem to check that it already wants to create an Index with name IX_ID for the TPT inheritance, leading finally to the exception in the database when the DDL is sent to create the database schema.

EF 4.2 (and before) didn't create any indices (except PK indices) at all, this was introduced in EF 4.3, especially indices for FK columns.

I didn't find a workaround. In the worst case you have to create the database schema manually and avoid that EF tries to create it (= disable database initialization). In the best case there is a way to disable automatic FK index creation, but I don't know if it's possible.

You can submit a bug report here: http://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio

Or maybe someone from EF development team will see your question here and provide a solution.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for looking in to this as far as you did. I reached the same conclusion when looking at the indexes that are generated in EF 4.2 vs 4.3 but I wasn't sure if I was doing something wrong or if there was a workaround. I'll report the bug and see if hopefully someone from the ADO.NET team can follow up with this. Thanks again! –  Lucifer Sam May 12 '12 at 16:51

When my project was updated from EF 6.0.2 to EF 6.1.1, I had such a problem, then back to 6.0.2, after the return of an older version, the error disappeared

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