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I am having an issue with font colors in IOS, I need to assign a color to the UITextView at runtime as the color displayed depends on a setting, however it seems that when I use the following RGB - 102, 0, 0 - I simply get red, rather than a kind of maroon that I was after. I have tried setting it using HSB as well.

Any thoughts on what could be wrong? A setting that I forgot to enable perhaps?

Thanks

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

UIColor takes colors between 0.0 and 1.0, not 0 and 255.

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Thanks very much! Now, is this just apple being difficult, or is this a standard that I am unaware of? – Zack Newsham May 4 '12 at 3:12
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All standard RGB values are expressed in 0-255/255 values because an 8-bit byte happens to store 256 values. – CodaFi May 4 '12 at 3:17
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This is a standard way of doing it (OpenGL does it as well). Many things in computer graphics are normalized to a 0 to 1 value. This makes sense because colors are not necessarily 8-bit (0-255). In this case they are 8-bit beacuse it is on iOS, but iOS rendering is built on OpenGL. – borrrden May 4 '12 at 3:17
    
OpenGL has been around for a LONG time, since before colors had 8 bits per channel. Also, in the future colors may not have 8-bits per channel, but because it is abstracted this way (0-1) the internals can change without affecting the interface. – borrrden May 4 '12 at 3:19
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@CodaFi When I was in college, we scanned things at 16-bits per channel into Photoshop. We then did our editing and dropped it to 8-bit in the end because the human eye already can't distinguish 255 shades, let alone 65,536* (FTFY hehe). – borrrden May 4 '12 at 3:24

In practice, use like this:

textField.textColor = UIColor(red: 1.0, green: 0.000, blue: 0.0, alpha: 1.0)
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