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I have the following code:

class  Array
{  
   public: 
       int aaa;
       Array():aaa(1){}
      void print()
      {
          cout << aaa << endl;
      }

      Array& operator++()
      {
          aaa++;
          return *this;
      }
      Array operator++(int)
      {
          Array a(*this);
          aaa++;
          return a;
      }
};

I have some questions as follows:

  1. why prefix returns a reference and postfix returns an object? In the book C++ Primer, the author only explained "For consistency with the built-in operators".

  2. Then, I tested the code:

    Array ar;

        (ar++).print(); // print 1
    
        ar.print(); // print 2
    

the output is exactly what I expected. Now I changed the code in the overloading postfix function as:

Array operator++(int)
{
     Array a(*this);
     a.aaa++; // changed this
     return a;
}

I called the test code:

Array ar;
(ar++).print(); // this prints 2
ar.print(); // this prints 1

Why I got such results?

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1  
You can't (more accurately, shouldn't) return a reference to a local variable, which is what you have in a postfix operator. For your last test, you only increment the temporary's a, not the actual object's. –  chris May 4 '12 at 4:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
  1. The postfix operator returns an object, not a reference, because it has to return an unchanged version of the current object; it has to return the value before the increment is done. Therefore a new object must be allocated. If you returned a reference, what would it be a reference to?

  2. In your second example, you're creating a new object, incrementing it, and returning it, but you're not changing the original object that the operator was applied to -- this is clearly wrong, so gives wrong results.

share|improve this answer
    
FFR, one asterisk surrounding something is italics and 2 is bold. –  chris May 4 '12 at 5:02
    
That's hilarious, sorry guys. Don't know what made me start typing BBCode! –  Ernest Friedman-Hill May 4 '12 at 5:07
    
OK, I got your words. But I have tried to change Array operator++(int) to void operator++(int) and it did actually work correctly. Why is that? Can you elaborate on that, please? –  ipkiss May 4 '12 at 6:30
    
@ipkiss -- if the return type is void, then you can't assign the result to anything -- I'd hardly call that "working correctly"! –  Ernest Friedman-Hill May 4 '12 at 11:10
    
If you can't assign the result, the it's impossible to tell the postfix increment operator from the prefix one. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill May 4 '12 at 11:24

While both prefix and postfix operators would intuitively seem to mutate the objects on which they're invoked, they actually have different semantic meanings. The prefix operator takes an an object, applies the increment operation to it, and returns the same object. The postfix operator takes an object, makes a copy of it, applies the increment operator to the orginal, and returns the copy.

It's for this reason that you may have seen various sources discouraging the use of the postfix operator when possible -- because the postfix copy creates a temporary object, it may be less efficient than the prefix operator. For an object that has to maintain a lot of state information, using the postfix operator can be expensive.

share|improve this answer
    
You have a small error: the postfix operator applies the modification to the original. –  chris May 4 '12 at 5:04
    
Whoops, my bad -- thanks for the comment. –  void-pointer May 4 '12 at 5:05

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