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I'm subclassing NSButton because I need to repeat a selector while the mouse is being held down.

I'm doing that like this:

- (id)initWithFrame:(NSRect)frame
{
    self = [super initWithFrame:frame];
    if (self) {
        // Initialization code here.
        [self setBezelStyle:NSBezelBorder];
        PotRightIsDown = NO;
    }

    return self;
}

- (void)drawRect:(NSRect)dirtyRect
{
    // Drawing code here.
}

- (void)mouseDown:(NSEvent *)theEvent;
{    
    NSLog(@"pot right mouse down");
    PotRightIsDown = YES;
    holdDownTimer = [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:0.1 target:self selector:@selector(sendCommand) userInfo:nil repeats:YES];
}

- (void)mouseUp:(NSEvent *)theEvent;
{
    NSLog(@"pot right mouse up");
    PotRightIsDown = NO;
}

-(void)sendCommand
{
    if (PotRightIsDown)
    {
        NSLog(@"run the stuff here");
    }
    else 
    {
        [holdDownTimer invalidate];
    }
}

Works like a champ, sends the command every 100ms.

In the window in IB, I've dragged a Bevel Button onto the window and set it's class to this subclass. When I ran the application, the button is invisible however it works. I'm guessing this is because I have an empty drawRect function in the subclass.

How can I make this subclassed button look like a Bevel button?

Thank you,
Stateful

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1  
[super drawRect:dirtyRect]? –  Carl Norum May 4 '12 at 5:39
    
Carl is right You need to write it in -drawRect method. But I see You use -mouseDown and -mouseUp it's called when pressed left button not right. If You want right You need to use -rightMouseDown and -rightMouseUp. –  Justin Boo May 4 '12 at 5:51
    
Well that was easy. Thanks for the tip, Carl. Please add it as an answer and I'll checkmark it. Justin, left mouse down is correct. I'm just calling it PotRight because when you hold it down it send commands out a serial port to a controller that interprets the command as the clockwise rotation of a potentiometer on the thing I'm controlling. –  Stateful May 4 '12 at 6:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you aren't adding any functionality to a particular subclass method then you can simply avoid implementing it altogether, which will allow the superclass to provide the default behaviour.

Alternatively (as pointed out my @Carl Norum) you can explicitly do that using:

- (void)drawRect:(NSRect)dirtyRect
{
    [super drawRect:dirtyRect];
}

But it's a bit pointless.

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