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I have several classes that need the following clone function to be defined:

struct Base
{
  virtual Base * clone() const = 0;
};

struct A : public Base
{
    Base * clone() const {
      return new A(*this);
  }
};

struct B : public Base
{
    Base * clone() const {
      return new B(*this);
  }
};

struct X : public Base2
{
    Base2 * clone() const {
      return new X(*this);
  }
};

I am trying to do this with a Cloneable mixin to avoid this redundant code:

template <typename BASE, typename TYPE>
class CloneableMixin
{
public:
  BASE*clone() const {
    return new TYPE( dynamic_cast<const TYPE &>(*this) );
  }
};

struct A : public Base, public CloneableMixin<Base, A>
{
};

However, this doesn't work, because in new TYPE(*this) from CloneableMixin, *this is of type CloneableMixin<BASE, TYPE>.

Update: the CloneableMixin can dynamic_cast to the correct type. But now I have another problem: CloneableMixin::clone doesn't successfully override Base::clone, and so the compiler reports A is a abstract type.

Can some clever use of virtual inheritance allow CloneableMixin::clone to override Base::clone? Is there some macro I should use for this?

Do you know of a way around all of this redundant code?

share|improve this question
    
Possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/9422760/… –  TemplateRex May 4 '12 at 6:22
1  
Base::clone needs to be virtual in order for =0 to be valid. –  TemplateRex May 4 '12 at 6:30
    
@rhalbersma I'm not sure if it's quite the same. Not all of my cloneable classes will have the same base type (e.g. Base, Base2). –  Oliver May 4 '12 at 6:31
    
@rhalbersma Thanks, good catch. –  Oliver May 4 '12 at 6:31

2 Answers 2

Can some clever use of virtual inheritance allow CloneableMixin::clone to override Base::clone?

Your CloneableMixin<Base,Derived> cannot override any method of Base - either polymorphically or by hiding - because CloneableMixin<Base,Derived> is not derived from Base.

On the other hand, if CloneableMixin<Base,Derived> were derived from Base you would no longer have any need for it to be a mixin, because -

class Derived : public CloneableMixin<Base,Derived> {....};

would inherit Base.

So for the needs of your example the solution illustrated here will suffice:

#include <iostream>

// cloner v1.0
template <class Base, class Derived>
struct cloner : Base
{
    Base *clone() const override {
        return new Derived( dynamic_cast<const Derived &>(*this) );
    }
    ~cloner() override {};
};

struct Base
{
    virtual Base * clone() const = 0;
    Base() {
        std::cout << "Base()" << std::endl;
    }
    virtual ~Base() {
        std::cout << "~Base()" << std::endl;
    }
};


struct A : cloner<Base,A> 
{
    A() {
        std::cout << "A()" << std::endl;
    }
    ~A() override {
        std::cout << "~A()" << std::endl;
    }
};

int main()
{
    A a;
    Base * pb = a.clone();
    delete pb;
}

(If you are compiling to the C++03 standard rather than C++11, then you may simply delete the occurrences of the override keyword.)

This solution will break down for some more real-worldly class hierarchies, e.g. in this illustration of the Template Method Pattern:

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>

using namespace std;

// cloner v1.0
template<class B, class D>
struct cloner : B
{
    B *clone() const override {
        return new D(dynamic_cast<D const&>(*this));
    }
    ~cloner() override {}       
};

/*  Abstract base class `abstract` keeps the state for all derivatives
    and has some pure virtual methods. It has some non-default
    constructors. 
*/
struct abstract 
{
    virtual ~abstract() {
        cout << "~abstract()" << endl;
    }
    int get_state() const {
        return _state;
    }
    void run() {
        cout << "abstract::run()" << endl;
        a_root_method();
        another_root_method();
    }
    virtual void a_root_method() = 0;
    virtual void another_root_method() = 0;
    virtual abstract * clone() const = 0;

protected:

    abstract()
    : _state(0) {
        cout << "abstract(): state = " << get_state() << endl;
    }
    explicit abstract(int state) : _state(state) {
        cout << "abstract(" << state << ") : state = " 
        << get_state() << endl;
    }   
    int _state;
};

/*  Concrete class `concrete` inherits `abstract`
    and implements the pure virtual methods.
    It echoes the constructors of `abstract`. Since `concrete`
    is concrete, it requires cloneability. 
*/
struct concrete : cloner<abstract,concrete> 
{   
    concrete() { 
        cout << "concrete(): state = " << get_state() << endl;
    }
    explicit concrete(int state) : abstract(state) {  //<- Barf!
        cout << "concrete(" << state << ") : state = " 
            << get_state() << endl;
    }
    ~concrete() override {
        cout << "~concrete()" << endl;
    }
    void a_root_method() override {
        ++_state; 
        cout << "concrete::a_root_method() : state = " 
            << get_state() << endl;
    }
    void another_root_method() override {
        --_state;
        cout << "concrete::another_root_method() : state = " 
            << get_state() << endl;
    }       
};

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    concrete c1;
    unique_ptr<abstract> pr(new concrete(c1));
    pr->a_root_method();
    pr->another_root_method();
    unique_ptr<abstract> pr1(pr->clone());
    pr1->a_root_method();
    return 0;
}

When we attempt to build this, the compiler will give an error at the initialization abstract(state) in the constuctor of concrete (at the Barf! comment), saying:

error: type 'abstract' is not a direct or virtual base of 'concrete'

or words to that effect. Indeed, the direct base of concrete is not abstract but cloner<abstract,concrete>. However, we cannot rewrite the constructor as:

/*Plan B*/ explicit concrete(int state) : cloner<abstract,concrete>(state){....}

Because there is has no such constructor as

cloner<abstract,concrete>::cloner<abstract,concrete>(int)

But the compiler's diagnostic suggests a fix. This is were virtual inheritance can help. We need abstract to become a virtual base of concrete, which means effectively "an honorary direct base of concrete", and we can achieve that just by making B a virtual base of cloner<B,D>:

// cloner v1.1
template<class B, class D>
struct cloner : virtual B
{
    B *clone() const override {
        return new D(dynamic_cast<D const&>(*this));
    }
    ~cloner() override {}       
};

With that, we have a clean build and output:

abstract(): state = 0
concrete(): state = 0
concrete::a_root_method() : state = 1
concrete::another_root_method() : state = 0
concrete::a_root_method() : state = 1
~concrete()
~abstract()
~concrete()
~abstract()
~concrete()
~abstract()

There are good reasons to be wary of virtual inheritance on principle and to reserve its use for at least for cases in which it has architectural rationale - not for workarounds, as we have used it just now.

If we prefer to do without virtual inheritance for this problem, then we must somehow ensure that there is a constructor of cloner<B,D> that echoes any constuctor of B, for arbitrary B. Then any corresponding constructor of D will be able to initialize its direct base cloner<B,D> whatever the arguments are.

This is a pipedream for C++03, but with the magic of variadic template parameters in C++11 it is easy:

// cloner v1.2
template<class B, class D>
struct cloner : B
{
    B *clone() const override {
        return new D(dynamic_cast<D const&>(*this));
    }
    ~cloner() override {}
    // "All purpose constructor"
    template<typename... Args>
    explicit cloner(Args... args)
    : B(args...){}  
};

With this, we can rewrite the concrete constructor as /*Plan B*/, and again we have a correct build and executable.

share|improve this answer
    
P.S. Compilation was with GCC 4.7.2 and Clang 3.2 –  Mike Kinghan Feb 26 '13 at 13:40

During the instantiation of your Cloneable mixin, the derived class is still in an incomplete type. You could try to add the proverbial extra leval of indirection like this:

template 
<
    typename Derived
>
class Cloneable 
:    
    private CloneableBase
{
public:
    Derived* clone() const
    {
        return static_cast<Derived*>(this->do_clone());
    }

private:
    virtual Cloneable* do_clone() const
    {
        return new Derived(static_cast<const Derived&>(*this));
    }
};

class CloneableBase
{
public:
    CloneableBase* clone() const
    {
        return do_clone();
    }

private:
    virtual CloneableBase* do_clone() const=0;
};

class MyClass: public Cloneable<MyClass>;
share|improve this answer
    
This solution does not work for me. In my case, A <- B <- C <- D. A is the base class (abstract), B is an abstract class too. C and D are concrete classes. A declares virtual A* clone() const = 0; and B does similar. When I let C <- Cloneable<C>, GCC says undefined reference to 'vtable for C'. The code works fine if I implement it by hand (not using templates). [ GCC 4.5.3, Cygwin ] –  Asuka Kenji - Siu Ching Pong - Mar 19 '13 at 8:26
    
@AsukaKenji-SiuChingPong- Could you provide a LiveWorkspace example to show your code? –  TemplateRex Mar 19 '13 at 11:46

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