Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know I can make it work doing the following code, but this is quite painful to read and type:

def changer   
  @animals[ "birds" ][2] = "Raven"
  @animals[ "birds" ][3] = "Spoonbill"
  display
end

def display
  puts "...#{@animals[ "birds" ][2]}, #{@animals[ "birds" ][3]}."
end

@animals = Hash.new
@animals[ "birds" ] = [ "Cardinal", "Bluejay", "Ostrich", "Flamingo" ]
puts @animals[ "birds" ][2] # => Ostrich
puts @animals[ "birds" ][3] # => Flamingo
changer

How can I make that look more like this? (Unfortinately I can't pass the variables as arguments either.)

Animals = Struct.new(:red, :blue, :black, :pink )

def changer
  @b.black = "Raven"
  @b.pink = "Spoonbill"
  display
end

def display
  puts "New birds are #{@b.red}, #{@b.blue}, #{@b.black}, #{@b.pink}."
  # definitely unchanged still... => New birds are Cardinal, Bluejay, Ostrich, Flamingo.
end

@animals = Hash.new
@animals[ "birds" ] = [ "Cardinal", "Bluejay", "Ostrich", "Flamingo" ]
@b = Animals.new(*@animals[ "birds" ] )
puts @b.black # => Ostrich
puts @b.pink  # => Flamingo
changer

Thanks in advance for any help or pointers.

EDIT: Well this is the best (working) code I've come up with so far. Warning: it isn't pretty.

Animals = Struct.new(:red, :blue, :black, :pink )

def changer
  b = Animals.new(*@animals[ "birds" ] )
  b.black = "Raven"
  b.pink = "Spoonbill"
  @animals[ "birds" ][2] = b.black
  @animals[ "birds" ][3] = b.pink
  display
end

def display
  b = Animals.new(*@animals[ "birds" ] )
  puts "New birds are #{b.red}, #{b.blue}, #{b.black}, #{b.pink}."
end

@animals = Hash.new
@animals[ "birds" ] = [ "Cardinal", "Bluejay", "Ostrich", "Flamingo" ]
b = Animals.new(*@animals[ "birds" ] )
puts b.black # => Ostrich
puts b.pink  # => Flamingo
changer
share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

The reason of your problem is you're creating a new Animal object in every method, and not passing around the one you created first. In display, a new Animal instance is created from scratch, based on the contents of the animal['birds'] hash. So its content will be of course unchanged.

Probably, you also didn't mean to create animals as an instance variable, but as a local variable: just omit the @.

Animals = Struct.new(:red, :blue, :black, :pink )

def changer(animal)
  animal.black = "Raven"
  animal.pink = "Spoonbill"
  display animal
end

def display(animal)
  puts "New birds are #{animal.red}, #{animal.blue}, #{animal.black}, #{animal.pink}."
end

animals = Hash.new
animals[ "birds" ] = [ "Cardinal", "Bluejay", "Ostrich", "Flamingo" ]
b = Animals.new(*animals[ "birds" ] )
puts b.black # => Ostrich
puts b.pink  # => Flamingo
changer b
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I didn't quite realize it was unique from the original hash. I'll just pass the argument around as you suggested. –  rubyuser1357796 May 4 '12 at 19:55
    
Be careful, however, there are other subtleties that need to be noticed; for example, changer may not be a good name for a method that also displays something (it calls display). –  Alberto Moriconi May 4 '12 at 20:01
    
The reason animals is an instance variable is because it needs to be accessed by methods where I can't pass arguments, so I didn't realize until now taking a better look at the code that passing "b" to changer won't work since it gets called from another method where the b Struct isn't even defined. Basically I just need write access to this hash from too many places it seems. More than one instance of the script is getting run at once so individual instance variables won't work either. –  rubyuser1357796 May 4 '12 at 20:34
    
I also updated the example to hopefully clear up what I am attempting to do. –  rubyuser1357796 May 4 '12 at 20:54
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.