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When I do git status in a subfolder of my repository it includes the status of parent folders also.

Is there a way to constrain git-status to just a particular folder?

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2  
Does "git status ." work? –  Jakub Narębski Jun 25 '09 at 21:47
1  
no, "git status ." gives sibling folders as e.g. "../sibling" –  EoghanM Jun 26 '09 at 12:56
    
Would you mind giving a little more context about why you want to filter out changes elsewhere in your tree? In what situations would you like to use this feature? –  Greg Bacon Jun 27 '09 at 16:34
1  
If there is more than a screenfull worth of output from the normal "git status" command –  EoghanM Jun 29 '09 at 7:47
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4 Answers

up vote 23 down vote accepted
git status .

will show the status of the current directory and subdirectories.

For instance, given files (numbers) in this tree:

a\1
a\2
b\3
b\4
b\c\5
b\c\6

from subdirectory "b", git status shows new files in the whole tree:

% git status
# On branch master
#
# Initial commit
#
# Changes to be committed:
#   (use "git rm --cached <file>..." to unstage)
#
#   new file:   ../a/1
#   new file:   ../a/2
#   new file:   3
#   new file:   4
#   new file:   c/5
#   new file:   c/6
#

but git status . just shows files in b and below.

% git status .
# On branch master
#
# Initial commit
#
# Changes to be committed:
#   (use "git rm --cached <file>..." to unstage)
#
#   new file:   3
#   new file:   4
#   new file:   c/5
#   new file:   c/6
#
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1  
Sorry took so long to come back to this answer - simple and correct! I wonder if <pathspec> was added to git status subsequent to my question? –  EoghanM Sep 5 '12 at 15:26
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Some plumbing commands do take a directory as parameter:

git ls-files -t -o -m aDirectory

would give you all files changed but not updated (not added to stage), or untracked. And that for a directory.

As written in this thread, git ls-files does not support a '--added option.

more fundamental reason is because ls-files plumbing is about the index.
Added is not about comparison between the index and the work tree.
It is between the HEAD commit and the index, and it does not belong to ls-files plumbing.

So, using commands mentioned here:

git diff-index --name-only -B -R -M -C HEAD src

would give you both non-added and added files

git diff-files --name-only -B -R -M -C src

would give you only non-added files. (while detecting rewrites, renames, copies, ...)

As usual with plumbing commands, some scripting is in order ;)

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nice! git ls-files -m worked for me –  murftown Dec 2 '11 at 17:47
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Imperfect, but this works as well from within the the directory you are interested in:

git status | grep -v ' \.\./'

That will hide all directories that would require an upward reference in their relative path.

If you want to get color spitting out the other end, set color.status to always:

git config color.status always
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1  
I love how grep always offers a makeshift solution if you don't know a more specific one. Cheers to taco-bell programming. –  murftown Dec 2 '11 at 17:49
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When I tried git, I didn't find a way to do that.

I ended up doing:

x@x:~/x$ git status
# On branch master
# Untracked files:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed)
#
#       b
#       main/a
nothing added to commit but untracked files present (use "git add" to track)

x@x:~/x$ git status | grep main
#       main/a
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This is the method I was using... the following also gets the status headings: git status |grep "main\|:\$" ... unfortunately you lose colouring. –  EoghanM Jun 26 '09 at 13:05
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