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Given two identical boost::variant instances a and b, the expression ( a == b ) is permitted.

However ( a != b ) seems to be undefined. Why is this?

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(!(a == b)) == (a != b) –  dragonfly Jun 29 '09 at 4:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I think it's just not added to the library. The Boost.Operators won't really help, because either variant would have been derived from boost::operator::equality_comparable. David Pierre is right to say you can use that, but your response is correct too, that the new operator!= won't be found by ADL, so you'll need a using operator.

I'd ask this on the boost-users mailing list.

Edit from @AFoglia's comment:

Seven months later, and I'm studying Boost.Variant, and I stumble over this better explanation of the omission lists.

http://boost.org/Archives/boost/2006/06/105895.php

operator== calls operator== for the actual class currently in the variant. Likewise calling operator!= should also call operator!= of the class. (Because, theoretically, a class can be defined so a!=b is not the same as !(a==b).) So that would add another requirement that the classes in the variant have an operator!=. (There is a debate over whether you can make this assumption in the mailing list thread.)

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Seven months later, and I'm studying Boost.Variant, and I stumble over this better explanation of the omission lists.boost.org/Archives/boost/2006/06/105895.php . Operator== calls operator== for the actual class currently in the variant. Likewise calling operator!= should also call operator!= of the class. (Because, theoretically, a class can be defined so a!=b is not the same as !(a==b).) So that would add another requirement that the classes in the variant have an operator!=. (There is a debate over whether you can make this assumption in the mailing list thread.) –  AFoglia Feb 1 '10 at 16:43

Because it doesn't need to.

Boost has an operators library which defines operator!= in term of operator==

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I could be wrong. But if variant uses the operators library, doesn't that mean that a != b should work? I think what he wants is using std::rel_ops instead: { using std::rel_ops::operator!=; getA() != getB(); } –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 25 '09 at 15:24
    
I didn't meant to say variant is using the lib itself, but that you can do it yourself to inject operator!= –  David Pierre Jun 25 '09 at 15:49
    
So the expectation is to include an additional header and add a using declaration in source files where != is desired? –  Drew Dormann Jun 25 '09 at 17:05

This is a link to the answer from the author himself when this question was formulated on boost mailing list

Summarizing it, in the author opinion, implementing comparison operators (!= and <) would add more requirements on the types used to create the variant type.

I don't agree with his point of view though, since != can be implemented in the same way as ==, without necessarily hiding the possible implementations of these operators for each of the types making up the variant

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