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I am currently trying to consitently structure multiple forms. I am not good at HTML, so my first attempt was using <table> tags to keep the forms consistent.

<table>
  <tr>
    <form>
      <td><input type="text" /></td><td><input type="submit" value="Display" /></td>
    </form>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <form>
      <td><input type="text" /></td><td><input type="submit" value="Display" /></td>
    </form>
  </tr>
</table>

The two forms represent two possible ways to select the data, so they need to be consistent both in code (i.e. I cannot consolidate them to a single form easily) and in visual style.

I was hoping for this to give me two forms, where the input fields and the buttons (in the original example there is more data and more buttons) are layed out consitently. However there are two problems with this:

  • This is abusing <table> for layouting. I know this is bad, but in this case, this was a drawback I was willing to take.
  • More gravely: This is not valid HTML as I just learned, since a <form> may not appear directly within a <tr>, only within a <td>. So these two forms do not work together as they should.

I had a look online on how to structure forms in HTML and found several links, but they all just deal with layouting single forms consistently (for example by using <dl> for layout, which is supposedly better than using <table>). This means I don't have any idea on how to apply this to my problem of consistently structuring those separate forms.

Is there any good way to achieve this?

EDIT:

Since some people seem to be confused by my explanation here is a diagram of what I am hoping that this will look like in the end:

Value1: [input_field1_which_is_longer]  [Button1]
Value2: [input_field2]                  [Button2]

Here [input_field1_which_is_longer] and [Button1] belong to one form. [input_field2] and [Button2] belong to a second form. Since these two forms offer two different methods of accessing the same data they should be aligned visually.

I need the two separate forms, because this way I can keep the processing part on the server side very simple (I do not need to check at all which button is pressed, the data alone is sufficient). If I try to turn this into a single form, then I would also have to detect which of the two buttons was pressed, which get's much more complicated on the processing side.

Also if I just put these forms into simple separate <div>s it will look out of shape because the first form is much longer than the second.

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What are you trying to achieve? –  PeeHaa May 4 '12 at 8:43
    
@RepWhoringPeeHaa: keep the layout of two forms consistent. I.e. each form has one input field (including a description in front of it) and multiple buttons. I want the descriptions, input field and buttons to line up horizontally. –  LiKao May 4 '12 at 8:55
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3 Answers

As an approach different from those in my first answer, you might consider not using a table in HTML markup but creating tabular presentation in CSS. The main problem appears to be lack of support in IE before IE 9. This might be acceptable in some cases; on old IE versions, the functionality would still exist and the markup would be valid, but the formatting would be poor.

In this approach, you would have a div element with, say, class=forms, containing form elements. Inside them, you would use span elements with, say, class=cell, instead of td elements. And you would use suitable display values in CSS, e.g.

<style>
.forms { display: table; }
form   { display: table-row; }
.cell  { display: table-cell; }
</style>
<div class="forms">
   <form action="...">
      <span class="cell"><input type="text" ... /></span>
      <span class="cell"><input type="submit" value="Display" /></span>
   </form>
   <form action="...">
      <span class="cell"><input type="text" ... /></span>
      <span class="cell"><input type="submit" value="Display" /></span>
   </form>
</div>
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Using a table for the structure of a form is OK; just ignore the religious objections, especially since fields and their labels constitute a good example of tabular data. (Not all data is numeric.)

The syntactic issue that you mention is more serious. Yes, it is certainly invalid markup by any HTML version. But it works. No, nobody can guarantee that will work on every browser under any circumstances. If you look at the page in Firebug, you’ll see that the code has not been parsed normally. Styling the forms may therefore fail.

HTML5 has features that let you associate form fields with forms using attributes, instead of normal simple association by syntactic nesting. They would solve the problem nicely, if only you could rely on them working cross-browser (you may need to wait a decade or so ☺).

If you use separate tables, each within a form of its own, you avoid this syntactic problem. But then you have a styling problem, since allocation of column widths takes place separately for each table. Setting fixed widths would fix this, and would not be too bad if the em unit is used, but it’s not ideal either: you would need to guess or estimate the widths, instead of letting browsers do it adaptively.

The ideal solution, if possible to implement, is to make it one large form, containing a table. The server-side form handler would then first need to check which button was used to submit it, and branch accordingly. This would not be feasible if the forms are complicated and differ in structure and functionality. But for a set of small forms it might work fine.

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Thanks for the detailed overview. I guess that means, that all of the options I have are somewhat flawed. The current version does not work correctly at least in chrome, so I do not want to keep it. HTML5 is also out of question. I guess the best solution will then be to actually choose a fixed maximum width and hope that everything works fine. I'll leave the question open for a while, but in case there are not other answers, I'll assume these are the only options and accept yours. –  LiKao May 4 '12 at 12:22
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Yeeh... I'd personally use <form> and then <ul> <li> or floated <div> anything apart from table which by standards should be used only for tabular data. You'll need to provide a bit more detail on what do you need to achieve. Personally I'm a bit confused.

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I tried to add some more explanation to make this clearer. I hope this helps. –  LiKao May 4 '12 at 9:06
    
Soo... well you can wrap your inputs with a <div> then apply the width to the div after the div add your button. With css float the button and the div left this will allow them to be next to each other. after each div button pair add an empty div with style clear:both –  Vic May 4 '12 at 9:11
    
Quick markup (forgive inline styles) <div style="width:200px;float:left><input></div><button style="float:left"><div style="clear:both"></div><div style="width:200px;float:left><input></div><button style="float:left"><div style="clear:both"></div> This should achieve the layout you set out to achieve. –  Vic May 4 '12 at 9:14
    
Yes, it does give me the layout I want (after some fixing). However I cannot use this, because this requires me to know the width of the input boxes beforehand, and this is dependent on the data I have. So what I need would be to somehow make the width of the second input dependent on the actual width of the first one. –  LiKao May 4 '12 at 9:44
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