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If instead of using mod_deflate or mod_gzip I would manually gzip a css or js file obtaining something like:

base.css.gz

And I rename it as:

base.css

And then load it from an HTML page, would it work?

This could be useful on environments with very limited memory and resources, like for examples wireless access points in mesh networks.

I also wanted to ask if it would have sense to do it on normal websites to save resources of the server's cpu? At the moment I use mod_deflate, I think with this method the contents gets gzipped at every request on the fly, is it so? Isn't that a bit of waste of resources?

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Are you talking about Apache? Tricking a web server into using HTTP compression without actually compressing looks very software specific to me. –  Álvaro G. Vicario May 4 '12 at 9:17
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2 Answers

HTTP servers if set to use compression on static files cache the compressed file for you - so don't worry about it.

IIS documentations here

I'm not too up on Apache, but mod_deflate and mod_cache work together http://serverfault.com/a/220418/7869

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ok but what about compressing the files manually on devices which don't use apache and on which mod_deflate cannot be installed? –  nemesisdesign May 6 '12 at 22:32
    
Like what? Routers are not web-servers. (OK some use a web server for admin UI - But they are NOT web-servers.) –  Adrian May 7 '12 at 11:09
    
All professional routers have some kind of light http server installed, but mod_deflate cannot be used because they do not have enough resources, so better to compress when is strictly needed. –  nemesisdesign Nov 6 '13 at 10:55
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I answer to myself because no one addressed my question.

It is possible to serve manually gzipped files, for example css, but they need to be served by the web-server with the correct content-type and compression headers, just loading a gzipped file from a <link> or <javscript> tag won't work.

Here's an example with php:

<?php
header("Content-Encoding: gzip");
header("Content-Type: text/css");
echo file_get_contents("base.min.css.gz");
exit(0);

// no closing tag to prevent occasionally printing any chars
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