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I'm adding values to a c# generic list while trying to prevent duplicates, but without success. Anyone know of a reason why this code below wouldn't work?

I have a simple class here:

public class DrivePairs
{
    public int Start { get; set; }
    public int End { get; set; }
}

And here is my method which tries to return a generic list of the above class:

ArrayList found = DriveRepository.GetDriveArray(9, 138);
List<DrivePairs> drivePairs = new List<DrivePairs>();
foreach (List<int> item in found)
{
    int count = item.Count;
    if (count > 1)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < (count - 1); i++)
        {
            DrivePairs drivePair = new DrivePairs();
            drivePair.Start = item[i];
            drivePair.End = item[i + 1];

            if (!drivePairs.Contains(drivePair))
                drivePairs.Add(drivePair);
        }
    }
}
drivePairs = drivePairs.Distinct().ToList();

As you can maybe see, I have an ArrayList, and each row contains a List<int>. What I'm doing is going through each and adding to a list which contains only pairs. E.g. if my List<int> contains [1,3,6,9] I want to add three entries to my pairs list:

[1,3]
[3,6]
[6,9]

It all works fine apart from not recognising duplicates. I thought this line would be enough:

if (!drivePairs.Contains(drivePair))
    drivePairs.Add(drivePair);

but it continues to add them all. Even when I add a Distinct() at the end, it still doesn't remove them. I've also tried adding them to a HashSet, but it still includes all the duplicates.

Anyone know of a reason why the duplicates might not be getting picked up?

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2  
Avoid using ArrayList - it is not type safe and should only be used in .NET 1.1 code where generics are not available. You should be using List<List<int>>. –  Oded May 4 '12 at 9:04
    
Ok, thanks for that. I'm not sure it is a problem regarding this issue, but appreciate the advice all the same –  e-on May 4 '12 at 9:06
    
How about Dictionary<int,int> –  Dotnet May 4 '12 at 9:08
    
It is not a solution to your issue, but a general recommendation. This is why I posted it as a comment and not an answer. –  Oded May 4 '12 at 9:09
    
@User - What will that achieve? –  Oded May 4 '12 at 9:09
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6 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your DrivePairs class does not specify equality, as a result, the Contains method will be using reference equality. Add an Equals method that uses both Start and End to determine equality and you will probably find your code works.

See: Equality Comparisons (C# Programming Guide)

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Hi Colin, yes that did the job. I'll add the exact code below as an answer but this was correct. Thanks. –  e-on May 4 '12 at 9:25
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List.Contains Method

This method determines equality by using the default equality comparer, as defined by the object's implementation of the IEquatable.Equals method for T (the type of values in the list).

Change your DrivePairs class

    public class DrivePairs: IEquatable<DrivePairs>
  {
    public int Start { get; set; }
    public int End { get; set; }



    public bool Equals(DrivePairs other)
    {
      if (this.Start == other.Start && this.End == other.End)
      {
        return true;
      }
      else
      {
        return false;
      }
    }
  } 

See: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bhkz42b3.aspx

Hope this helps

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Wixon, didn't see this until I'd marked the other as the answer. This also works really well. Good answer –  e-on May 4 '12 at 9:35
    
You're welcome! –  Wixon May 4 '12 at 9:40
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You are creating new List<int> objects - these are different objects and when compared to each other, even if they contain identical values (in the same or in different orders), will be evaluated as different as the default comparison method on reference types is a reference comparison.

You need to write a custom comparer that will identify equal lists in the manner your application requires.

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I have not tested it but I think the default equality test is if it is the same instance. Try overriding the Equals method and make it use your properties.

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The DrivePairs class type is a reference type(remember reference type and value type concept). So when you check if DrivePairs varible is already added in List collections or not it return false as every DrivePairs varibale has different memory location from other.

Try using either Dictionary or StringDictionary or any other Key value pair collection. It will definately work.

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I've marked Colin's as the answer, but here was the code just in case it's any use to anyone:

Equality comparer:

    public class EqualityComparer : IEqualityComparer<DrivePairs>
    {
        public bool Equals(DrivePairs x, DrivePairs y)
        {
            return x.StartHub.Equals(y.Start);
        }

        public int GetHashCode(DrivePairs obj)
        {
            return obj.Start.GetHashCode();
        }
    }

and in the controller:

IEqualityComparer<DrivePairs> customComparer = new EqualityComparer();

IEnumerable<DrivePairs> distinctDrivePairs = drivePairs.Distinct(customComparer);
drivePairs = distinctDrivePairs.ToList();

Thanks for all the help and comments

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