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When doing embedded programming with C, many times I find myself doing maps with enum and array because they are fast and memory efficient.

enum {
    ID_DOG = 0,
    ID_SPIDER,
    ID_WORM,
    ID_COUNT
};
int const NumberOfEyes[ID_COUNT] = {
    2,
    8,
    0
};

Problem is that sometimes when adding/removing items, I make mistake and enum and array go out of sync. If initializer list is too long, compiler will detect it, but not other way around.

So is there reliable and portable compile time check that initializer list matches the length of the array?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What about a compile time assertion like the following? (Yes, there are more elaborate CT_ASSERT macros; this is to illustrate the idea.)

#define CT_ASSERT(expr, name) typedef char name[(expr)?1:-1]

enum {
    ID_DOG = 0,
    ID_SPIDER,
    ID_WORM,
    ID_COUNT
};

int const NumberOfEyes[] = {
    2,
    8,
    0
};

CT_ASSERT (sizeof NumberOfEyes/sizeof *NumberOfEyes == ID_COUNT, foo);

Now when the NumberOfEyes array has more or less elements than ID_COUNT, this will cause an error along x.c:15: error: size of array 'foo' is negative. Negative array dimensions are a constraint violation that must be diagnosed by any C compiler out there.

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The name parameter to the macro isn't necessary if you make sure the macro is declared at a local scope. #define CT_ASSERT(expr) { typedef char ct_assert[(expr)?1:-1]; }. –  Lundin May 7 '12 at 8:33
    
True, but why restrict yourself to block scope? I have a number of file scope arrays that need checking as well. Using a well selected name will also give a clue in the compiler error message about what exactly is the problem, e.g. instead of foo I'd use enum_mismatch_in_NumberOfEyes. –  Jens May 7 '12 at 9:21
1  
Since the actual code using the array is not executed at file scope, simply place the assert in the code that is accessing the array. The advantages of doing so are many: the assert ends up encapsulated together with the relevant code, so only that code sees it. And you don't pollute the global namespace with the mysterious macro. Also, the compiler error message doesn't necessarily contain the variable name. In my compiler I just get something like "illegal constant expression", but it points out the exact line causing the problem, so it isn't really an issue. –  Lundin May 7 '12 at 9:43
    
These are good points! –  Jens May 7 '12 at 10:22
    
I chose this answer as it is reasonably easy to add to my existing code. –  user694733 May 10 '12 at 8:44

This is possibly a situation where X macros could be applied.

animals.x

X(DOG,    2)
X(SPIDER, 8)
X(WORM,   0)

foo.c

enum {
#define X(a,b) ID_##a,
#include "animals.x"
#undef X
};

int const numberOfEyes[] = {
#define X(a,b) b,
#include "animals.x"
#undef X
};

This not only guarantees that the lengths match, but also that the orders are always kept in sync.

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Excellent answer, this is the very problem I was struggling with before I discovered the power of x-macros. See stackoverflow.com/questions/6635851/real-world-use-of-x-macros –  ACRL May 4 '12 at 12:50
    
I corrected an error in the answer; you had each of the lines in the animals.x file prefixed with #define, when they should be expanding the macro rather than (re)defining it. –  Brooks Moses May 5 '12 at 19:48
    
Is it just me or do X-macros cause eye cancer to others as well? :-) How is make and auto-generation of dependencies affected? What about refactoring tools? Source code formatters like indent? –  Jens May 5 '12 at 19:59
    
I am a big fan of x-macros but a colleague pointed out that they do make debugging a bit of a pain. If this is something where you're likely to need debug-ability, you could try using cog or similar instead. –  Vicky May 5 '12 at 20:38
    
@Jens: X-macros are just a combination of header files and macros; if a tool can't cope with them, then it's arguably a failure of that tool. But I appreciate that debuggers or code IDE auto-completion often stumble over macros. That said, I haven't personally encountered a situation where this has been problematic (e.g. my auto-generated dependencies appear to work fine). –  Oliver Charlesworth May 5 '12 at 20:40

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