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how to do this in a single line.

   b=[['1','2','3','4','5'],['11','12','13','14','15'],['6','7','8','9','10']]
   c=[]
   for x in b:
        for y in x:
            c.append(int(y))
   c.sort()
   print(c)

expected output:

[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15]
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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted
>>> b=[['1','2','3','4','5'],['11','12','13','14','15'],['6','7','8','9','10']]
>>> sorted(int(j) for i in b for j in i)
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15]
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1UP: Neat solution, no imports required. –  MattH May 4 '12 at 10:34
1  
My +1. The only thing that I do not like is to use the l identifier ;) –  pepr May 4 '12 at 10:35
    
thanks worked fine! –  Aशwini चhaudhary May 4 '12 at 10:37
    
@pepr I changed it to use the conventional i and j to iterate through now. –  jamylak May 4 '12 at 10:40
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import itertools
c = sorted(int(a) for a in itertools.chain(*b))

or, as @jamylak correctly noted:

import itertools
c = sorted(int(a) for a in itertools.chain.from_iterable(b))

using map is a little bit faster (and faster than the double list comprehension in @jamylak's answer):

import itertools
c = sorted(map(int, itertools.chain.from_iterable(b)))
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Oh, heck. I forgot about itertools. ;) –  Li-aung Yip May 4 '12 at 10:27
1  
Why does nobody like chain.from_iterable? –  jamylak May 4 '12 at 10:29
    
@eumiro this is faser than jamylak's answer? –  Aशwini चhaudhary May 4 '12 at 10:32
    
@user1374499 - not really. In this case, it is 6 percent slower. –  eumiro May 4 '12 at 10:33
1  
@user1374499 - using map(int… makes it faster than his answer. –  eumiro May 4 '12 at 10:36
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Another variation

>>> from itertools import chain
>>> b=[['1','2','3','4','5'],['11','12','13','14','15'],['6','7','8','9','10']]
>>> sorted(chain(*b),key=int)
['1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9', '10', '11', '12', '13', '14', '15']

and in case you want a list of integers then

>>> sorted(map(int,chain(*b)))
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15]

Speed comparison

>>> t1=Timer(stmt='sorted(map(int,chain(*b)))',setup='from __main__ import b;from itertools import chain')
>>> t2=Timer(stmt='sorted(int(i) for l in b for i in l)',setup='from __main__ import b')
>>> t3=Timer(stmt='sorted(int(a) for a in chain(*b))',setup='from __main__ import b;from itertools import chain')
>>> print "%.2f usec/pass" % (1000000 * t1.timeit(number=100000)/100000)
33.23 usec/pass
>>> print "%.2f usec/pass" % (1000000 * t2.timeit(number=100000)/100000)
35.60 usec/pass
>>> print "%.2f usec/pass" % (1000000 * t3.timeit(number=100000)/100000)
36.19 usec/pass
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1  
OP wanted a list of int objects. –  MattH May 4 '12 at 10:32
    
@MattH:Sorry I missed that part. –  Abhijit May 4 '12 at 10:33
    
but you're also importing itertools for t1&t3. –  Aशwini चhaudhary May 4 '12 at 10:43
    
@AshwiniChaudhary: I didn;t get your concern. Does importing itertools hurts in any manner? If you see using map, even with the import overhead is faster. –  Abhijit May 4 '12 at 10:45
    
No concerns now, actually from itertools import chain was not visible to me inside Timer until I scrolled. –  Aशwini चhaudhary May 4 '12 at 10:50
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