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I am working on a very simple stopwatch using WPF but using the System.Diagnostics stopwatch was very slow and not reliable at all, compared to my system clock every 1 second from my application was 3 seconds on an actual clock.

I did some search about stopwatch being slow, found lots of results but no solution to it, so I decided to come up with my own counter.

Here is an sample of what I came up with:

System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherTimer _update;
DateTime _started;
bool isRunning = false;

The update thread:

_update = new System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherTimer(new TimeSpan(0, 0, 0, 0, 1), System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherPriority.Normal, delegate
{
    if (isRunning)
        iTimer.Content = new DateTime((DateTime.Now - _started).Ticks).ToString("HH:mm:ss");
}, this.Dispatcher);

I have 2 buttons, bToggle which is resposible for starting, stopping and resuming it and another button called bReset.

private void bReset_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    isRunning = false;
    iTimer.Content = "00:00:00";
    bToggle.Content = "Start";
}

private void bToggle_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    if ((string)bToggle.Content == "Start")
    {
        isRunning = true;
        _started = DateTime.Now;
        bToggle.Content = "Stop";
    }
    else if ((string)bToggle.Content == "Resume")
    {
        isRunning = true;
        bToggle.Content = "Stop";
    }
    else
    {
        isRunning = false;
        bToggle.Content = "Resume";
    }
}

It works fine to start and reset but since I am using the actual time if I stop and resume, it will jump the seconds until the actual time.

How could I solve this problem or is there an alternative to stopwatch that actually have a good accuracy on the current time ?

share|improve this question
    
What were you using StopWatch for? –  Oded May 4 '12 at 10:48
    
For a stopwatcher ? To put it simple it counts from 0 until u stop or reset. –  Guapo May 4 '12 at 10:49
1  
It just sounds like you were trying to use it as a timer. –  Oded May 4 '12 at 10:50
    
Something like this sport-impianti.com/wp-content/gallery/atletica/4103.jpg but as a desktop application. Either way if u look at the above code, its a fully working on, I just need to figure out how to do the stop/resume function or if there is a better way to control it. –  Guapo May 4 '12 at 10:50
    
StopWatch has issues on some hardware(for example constant offsets between cores), but I never heard of a multiplicative error. Can you post your StopWatch code? –  CodesInChaos May 4 '12 at 10:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to intruduce an additional variable TimeSpan accumulatedTime in which you save the elapsed interval whenever someone clicks stop.

And:

iTimer.Content = (new DateTime((DateTime.Now - _started).Ticks) + accumulatedTime).ToString("HH:mm:ss");
share|improve this answer
    
Great point, thanks. –  Guapo May 4 '12 at 10:57
    
very appreciated, I have resolved it with the follow: new DateTime((DateTime.Now.Subtract(accumulatedTime) - _tempo).Ticks).ToString("HH:mm:ss"); –  Guapo May 4 '12 at 11:07

Use System.Timers.Timer

You can start and stop this, and set a counter in the timers tick event.

This is a simple example:

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    private Timer _timer;
    private int _time;

    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        _time = 0;

        _timer = new Timer(1000);
        _timer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(_timer_Elapsed);
    }

    void _timer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {

        Dispatcher.Invoke(new Action(() =>
                                         {
                                             _time++;
                                             tbTime.Text = _time.ToString();
                                         }));

    }

    private void btnStartStop_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (_timer.Enabled)
        {
            _timer.Stop();
        }
        else
        {
            _timer.Start();
        }
    }
}

Xaml:

<Grid>
    <StackPanel>
        <Button Name="btnStartStop" Content="start/stop timer" Click="btnStartStop_Click" />
        <TextBlock Name="tbTime" Text="00:00" />
    </StackPanel>
</Grid>
share|improve this answer
    
the fact I am using a thread is so it doesn't hang my application UI –  Guapo May 4 '12 at 11:07
    
this dosn't lock your UI, but if you want to be safe put the timer in a backgroundworker and forward the tick event to worker progresschanged event –  jrb May 4 '12 at 11:11
    
jrb if you are constantly moving the app window it does. –  Guapo May 4 '12 at 11:15
    
The timer starts in a new thread. Check edit, works fine.. –  jrb May 4 '12 at 11:28

I think this line is your problem:

_update = new System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherTimer(new TimeSpan(0, 0, 0, 0, 1), System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherPriority.Normal

It tells WPF that you want your delegate to execute 1000 times per second, and to schedule it at the second-highest priority. That's a higher priority than Render and DataBind, and I think both Render and DataBind are needed to actually display the updated value you put in iTimer.Content.

You should set the DispatcherPriority to Background and use a lower frequency (e.g. 20 ms - humans can't see anything faster than 50 fps, anyway.)

share|improve this answer
    
With the code in my question it updates just fine but using the stopwatch class it was not so that would cut out that line as being the problem in my opinion. –  Guapo May 4 '12 at 11:25

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