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I have a spreadsheet that's connected to an Oracle database. It populates Excel using a query pulling specific fields from the database. I want to view the query that it is using so I can modify it.

It is using Office 2003 & Oracle 11g. At the moment, it refreshes automatically with the latest data. I need to reverse engineer the query so it gives me all the information from yesterday only.

Can anyone advise?

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Is it Alt-F11 to see the VBA code in Excel? –  MatBailie May 4 '12 at 10:51
    
Yes, thanks, that seems to open the VBAProject view! Can I find the query from here? –  GrumP May 4 '12 at 10:53
    
Now is the time to just poke around. You may find modules, etc, have been password protected. Maybe somethine as niaive as searching for "SELECT" or "EXEC"? –  MatBailie May 4 '12 at 11:00
    
Can't see anything in here. When I click the Data tab in excel, I can see "Import External Data" and I can edit what the query includes, (what fields to select) but not the actual query. –  GrumP May 4 '12 at 11:05

2 Answers 2

We are still using 2003 Excel also. I never could see any icon like a hand holding a document but I found a way around it. When you choose edit the query and you just hit next until the button changes to finish you will see a save query button. I saved the query and then went into it with Notebook and it looked like this-

XLODBC
1
DBQ=J:\SHEALY.mdb;DefaultDir=J:\;Driver={Microsoft Access Driver (*.mdb)};DriverId=25;FIL=MS Access;MaxBufferSize=2048;MaxScanRows=8;PageTimeout=5;SafeTransactions=0;Threads=3;UserCommitSync=Yes;
SELECT `Inventory by Class - Detail`.ITEMNO, `Inventory by Class - Detail`.CLASS, `Inventory by Class - Detail`.ONHAND, `Inventory by Class - Detail`.EPLANT_ID  FROM `J:\SHEALY`.`Inventory by Class - Detail` `Inventory by Class - Detail`  WHERE (`Inventory by Class - Detail`.ITEMNO Like 'I%') OR (`Inventory by Class - Detail`.ITEMNO Like 'UI%')  ORDER BY `Inventory by Class - Detail`.ITEMNO, `Inventory by Class - Detail`.EPLANT_ID


ITEMNO  CLASS   ONHAND  EPLANT_ID

My goal was to find the original source query. This told me what it was and then I could go back to the source and change the selection criteria.

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This is very interesting. I'll take a look at this tomorrow! –  GrumP Apr 7 '13 at 16:46

I don't a later version of Excel on my PC, so I can't give you an exact on the buttons to press/screens to look at, however I have done HEAPS with embedded data sources from various databases.

You need to look at "External Data" Connections. I think in 2003 you can still right click on the table with the data and access the external data properties from there (as well as select 'refresh')

Inside that you will find a button that leads to the definition: - a single table(/view) - or a SELECT statement

The select statement is what you need to look at.

NOTE: There are two ways of looking at he query - one loads the external MS Query tool - that you don't want - and the otehr will just display the raw query within Excel - this is what you want.

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When I right click, I can see Edit Query, Data Range Properties, Parameters (greyed out) and Refresh Data. When I click Edit Query, it loads up a little window "Microsoft ODBC for Oracle Connect" Then "Connecting to data source" and it opens a basic wizard to chose columns from the db to display. –  GrumP May 4 '12 at 11:36
    
I think you are close... can you check Data Range Properties, do you see an icon like a hand holding a document? That should click through to a Properties dialog that will let you edit the query Definition. I am using XL2007 but I think the external data wizard was the same in 2003. –  andy holaday May 5 '12 at 0:45

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