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I have a class ZoneDeVie containing a vector of vectors of Bacterie*. The Bacterie class contains an int value energie (set to 10 by default) and a toString() function which prints the value. In the ZoneDeVie constructor, I build the 2D table, populating each cell with a default instance of a Bacterie. Then, in my main method, I'm testing by printing the toString() of the last Bacterie in the table. For some reason, it returns a random, obnoxiously-large int (usually something like: 3753512); however, if I make a call to the Bacterie's toString() method in the constructor of ZoneDeVie, the main method will print out correctly.

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

class Bacterie {
public:
    Bacterie() { this->energie = 10; }
    string toString() {
        stringstream ss;
        ss << "Energie: " << this->energie;
        return ss.str();
    }
protected:
    int energie;
};

class ZoneDeVie {
public:
    ZoneDeVie(int width, int height) {
        Bacterie* bac = new Bacterie();

        // without this [following] line, the call to `toString`
        // in the main method will return an obnoxiously-large value
        //bac->toString();
        for (int i=0; i<height; i++) {
            vector<Bacterie*> bacvec = vector<Bacterie*>();
            this->tableau.push_back(bacvec);
            for (int j=0; j<width; j++) {
                this->tableau[i].push_back(bac);
            }
        }
    }
    vector<vector<Bacterie*> > tableau;
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    int x,y;
    x = 9; y = 39;
    ZoneDeVie zdv = ZoneDeVie(10,40);
    cout << "zdv(" << x << "," << y << ") = " << zdv.tableau[x][y]->toString();

    return 0;
}

output (with a call to "toString()" in ZoneDeVie's constructor): zdv(9,39) = Energie: 10

output (w/o a call to "toString()" in ZoneDeVie's constructor): zdv(9,39) = Energie: 4990504

Why in the world do I need to call my toString() method before calling it in the main method in order for it to behave as expected?

share|improve this question
    
Have you defined the destructor ZoneDeVie::~ZoneDeVie? – mfontanini May 4 '12 at 11:29
    
You must have some undefined behaviour for writing or reading beyond the bounds of an array, or accessing some part of memory you shouldn't, or some uninitialized primitive type or pointer somewhere. – juanchopanza May 4 '12 at 11:30
    
Any reason for all the pointers? – chris May 4 '12 at 11:30
    
Do you intentionally put 400 times same pointer to your vectors? – Tadeusz Kopec May 4 '12 at 11:32
1  
Okay, we can't guess. Post a SSCCE: sscce.org – mfontanini May 4 '12 at 12:47
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The end condition in your for loops are swapped. You should first iterate through width and then through height:

class ZoneDeVie {
public:
    ZoneDeVie(int width, int height) {
        Bacterie* bac = new Bacterie();

        for (int i=0; i<width; i++) {
            vector<Bacterie*> bacvec = vector<Bacterie*>();
            this->tableau.push_back(bacvec);
            for (int j=0; j<height; j++) {
                this->tableau[i].push_back(bac);
            }
        }
    }
    vector<vector<Bacterie*> > tableau;
};

This compiles and provides the correct output.

share|improve this answer
    
Although the formal semantics do require copy construction here, the standard explicitly allows it to be elided, and I don't know of a compiler which doesn't elide it. – James Kanze May 4 '12 at 11:51
    
I defined ZoneDeVie::~ZoneDeVie, but it does nothing ({})... Anyway, could you be more explicit with respect to explaining why calling toString() in the ZoneDeVie constructor has any bearing on what happens in the main method? – weberc2 May 4 '12 at 12:18
    
Additionally, removing ZoneDeVie::~ZoneDeVie doesn't affect the outcome at all. – weberc2 May 4 '12 at 12:19
    
Thank you very much. Even with the loops reversed, could you explain why the "bac->toString();" line affected the outcome? – weberc2 May 4 '12 at 13:31
    
Also, for what it's worth, I'd like to +1 your answer; however, someone downvoted my question putting me below the minimum rep to upvote. Sorry :( – weberc2 May 4 '12 at 13:33

There are several issues with this code.

  1. It's not clear what the default constructor of Bacterie does.

  2. It's not clear what ZoneDeVie::tableau is and how the local vector bacvec is used.

  3. It's not clear how the copy constructor and operator= for class ZoneDeVie are defined (both are used in main()).

  4. It seems that all entries in your table are initialised with a pointer to the same Bacterie bac

share|improve this answer
    
1) Bacterie::Bacterie() {this->energie = 10;} 2) ZoneDeVie::tableau is the vector of vectors, as previously stated. bacvec is a row in the table being used to populate the table in the ZoneDeVie constructor. 3) operator= is not overridden and ZoneDeVie is not a derived class 4) That is correct – weberc2 May 4 '12 at 12:05
    
@weberc2: That should be part of the question, not a comment. – David Rodríguez - dribeas May 4 '12 at 13:11
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas that information was already available or derivable based on the contents of the question. It seems silly to reiterate it. In the event I was being unclear, I've edited my answer to include a compilable example. – weberc2 May 4 '12 at 13:28
    
@weberc2: I am not sure if you are aware that if the obvious was true, there would be no question. When asking for help, make sure to help others in helping you. Trying to guess what may be wrong in your code based on assumptions makes no sense. – David Rodríguez - dribeas May 4 '12 at 13:42
    
I made no assumptions. I offered all relevant parts of my code and addressed each of his concerns; however, I didn't see value in lengthening my answer to highlight things that seemed evident in the code. And if the asker misread the material available, there could still be a question regardless of how accurate or complete the aforementioned material was. Thinking this might be the case, I felt it better to address his concerns here rather than lengthening my question. – weberc2 May 4 '12 at 13:53

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