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As mentioned in Question how can I write a regular expression to accept from 00100 to 99999.

I have written

\d{5}

But it will accept all zeros also.

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I assume you also don't want to allow 00099 then, right? –  Mark Byers May 4 '12 at 11:37
    
@Mark Byers Yes... –  Exception May 4 '12 at 11:38
    
I don't really understand what you mean. Is it only integers? If yes, can you provide the min and the max the regex should match? –  sp00m May 4 '12 at 11:39
2  
You can use theregular expression but regexp are really more suitable for matching strings, not for checking numerical bounds. Instead, try just to validate if the string is numerical and then validate the number with comparison operators. –  Tibor May 4 '12 at 12:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Alternatively you can just disallow the numbers that you don't want to include using negative look ahead assertions:

^(?!000)\d{5}$

Which does not match any five digit number that has three zeroes at the beginning which is also what you want.

See it

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Try this:

^00[1-9][0-9]{2}$|^0[1-9][0-9]{3}$|^[1-9][0-9]{4}$

See it working online: rubular

Note that regular expressions are not a good tool for accepting arbitraty integer ranges. It may be easier to read if you convert your string to an integer and use ordinary code to test that the integer is in range.

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[0-9]{2}[1-9]{1}[0-9]{2}

This reads like this:

[0-9]{2} I want exactly 2 digits....you could have used \d{2} here.

[1-9]{1} I want exactly 1 digit in the 1-9 range. The {1} is unneeded, but I think helps with clarity.

[0-9]{2} I want exactly 2 digits again.

Should give you exactly what you want.

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