Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
String x = "Welcome to Java World";
System.out.println(x.replaceAll(".*","JAVA"));
Actual Output = "JAVAJAVA" .
Excepted Output = "JAVA".

Can anybody help why it replace like this . ".*" all characters in a original string and replace this with "JAVA" . Why this returns "JAVAJAVA" .

share|improve this question
    
Could you try ".+" as the regex? Maybe the matching considers the empty String a substring of any String, and then the actual content of the String as a second substring, thus replacing twice? More of a shot in the dark than anything though. –  G. Bach May 4 '12 at 13:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Your regular expression can match 0 to all characters. First, it matches the entire string "Welcome to Java World", then it matches the end of the string "", replacing both with "JAVA".

To make this work how you expect it, you have a couple options.

String x = "Welcome to Java World";
System.out.println(x.replaceAll(".+","JAVA"));

Notice the + instead of the *, this means 1 or many, so the end won't be matched.

or

String x = "Welcome to Java World";
System.out.println(x.replaceFirst(".*","JAVA"));

This will only replace the entire string with "JAVA", the empty end of the string won't be replaced.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, do you maybe know a link where this (I mean how, where and why every String contains the empty substring) is explained in detail? It is somewhat surprising, though not difficult to understand. –  G. Bach May 4 '12 at 13:13
    
I think the most clear location for this type of thing is the source itself. It will take some poking around that class to really understand what is going on, but that is the best way to really understand. –  Nick Garvey May 14 at 2:40

You don't need replaceAll for your mission. The exact same semantics are achieved by simply stating

System.out.println("JAVA");

Since String is immutable in Java, you cannot avoid getting a new object.

share|improve this answer
    
Not really relevant to the question since this is about regex, not about how to have a String contain the content he wants. –  G. Bach May 4 '12 at 13:08
    
I'm not sure it's about regex. The question didn't motivate it. –  Marko Topolnik May 4 '12 at 13:09

why using "replaceAll" and not "="? Strings are immutable in java

share|improve this answer

You can also use the below format x.replaceAll(".*\z", "JAVA");

As .* will match till before the end of string and \z will match the end of string character.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.