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I have several sorted sequences of numbers of type long (ascending order) and want to generate one master sequence that contains all elements in the same order. I look for the most efficient sorting algorithm to solve this problem. I target C#, .Net 4.0 and thus also welcome ideas targeting parallelism.

Here is an example:
s1 = 1,2,3,5,7,13
s2 = 2,3,6
s3 = 4,5,6,7,8
resulting Sequence = 1,2,2,3,3,4,5,5,6,6,7,7,8,13

Edit: When there are two (or more) identical values then the order of those two (or more) does not matter.

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Time efficient? Space efficient? Some other efficiency parameter? –  Oded May 4 '12 at 13:48
    
Time efficient or space efficient? –  npinti May 4 '12 at 13:48
    
You can do each two sub's merge in O(n) complexity using a simple for loop. –  Yorye Nathan May 4 '12 at 13:48
    
Time efficient. –  Matt Wolf May 4 '12 at 13:49
    
Lol, seems to be much less a trivial question as was hinted by early commenters, given there are 4 completely opposing answers popping up <10 minutes after I posted. Just wanted to point to my original question asking for ideas for the most efficient algorithm for my specific problem, which means I definitely do not look for a C# built-in function because non that I am aware of optimize on the fact that the sub-sequences are already sorted. –  Matt Wolf May 4 '12 at 13:58

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

UPDATE:

Turns out that with all the algorithms... It's still faster the simple way:

private static List<T> MergeSorted<T>(IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> sortedBunches)
{
    var list = sortedBunches.SelectMany(bunch => bunch).ToList();

    list.Sort();

    return list;
}

And for legacy purposes...

Here is the final version by prioritizing:

    private static IEnumerable<T> MergeSorted<T>(IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> sortedInts) where T : IComparable<T>
    {
        var enumerators = new List<IEnumerator<T>>(sortedInts.Select(ints => ints.GetEnumerator()).Where(e => e.MoveNext()));

        enumerators.Sort((e1, e2) => e1.Current.CompareTo(e2.Current));

        while (enumerators.Count > 1)
        {
            yield return enumerators[0].Current;

            if (enumerators[0].MoveNext())
            {
                if (enumerators[0].Current.CompareTo(enumerators[1].Current) == 1)
                {
                    var tmp = enumerators[0];
                    enumerators[0] = enumerators[1];
                    enumerators[1] = tmp;
                }
            }
            else
            {
                enumerators.RemoveAt(0);
            }
        }

        do
        {
            yield return enumerators[0].Current;
        } while (enumerators[0].MoveNext());
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the code, I tried it out but it does not work as expected. I tested it with an array of two arrays of type long each containing hundred thousands of values. It seems to be trapped in an infinite loop or is incredibly inefficient for small number of sequences but many elements per sequence...or...possible bug? –  Matt Wolf May 4 '12 at 17:15
    
Could you please pastebin the arrays you've used? –  Yorye Nathan May 4 '12 at 17:16
    
hardly possible (with hundreds of thousands of elements) but here is a small subset: 634398912001390000 634398912001540000 634398912002130000 634398912003100000 634398912003120000 634398912003120000 634398912003130000 –  Matt Wolf May 4 '12 at 17:22
    
And how exactly do you expect them to be merged? It's a simple sorted array of longs. You want to merge the digits? What? –  Yorye Nathan May 4 '12 at 17:27
    
I want the values of type long to be sorted in ascending order. Each sequence contains similar values of type long. As you can see the sample I pasted are values of type long in strictly ascending order.Not sure what you are asking cause I thought it was clear. Can you explain what is unclear please? –  Matt Wolf May 4 '12 at 17:37

Easy way is to merge them with each other one by one. However, this will require O(n*k^2) time, where k is number of sequences and n is the average number of items in sequences. However, using divide and conquer approach you can lower this time to O(n*k*log k). The algorithm is as follows:

  1. Divide k sequences to k/2 groups, each of 2 elements (and 1 groups of 1 element if k is odd).
  2. Merge sequences in each group. Thus you will get k/2 new groups.
  3. Repeat until you get single sequence.
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1  
And if you use a priority queue and a K-way merge algorithm, it becomes O(n log k). –  Jim Mischel May 4 '12 at 14:07
1  
@JimMischel: yes! I just noticed you answer, upvoting for it! –  ffriend May 4 '12 at 14:10

There is no .NET Framework method that I know of to do a K-way merge. Typically, it's done with a priority queue (often a heap). It's not difficult to do, and it's quite efficient. Given K sorted lists, together holding N items, the complexity is O(N log K).

I show a simple binary heap class in my article A Generic Binary Heap Class. In Sorting a Large Text File, I walk through the creation of multiple sorted sub-files and using the heap to do the K-way merge. Given an hour (perhaps less) of study, and you can probably adapt that to use in your program.

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this sounds very interesting, will definitely take a look, thanks for the hints and links. Will revert after toying with it. –  Matt Wolf May 4 '12 at 14:11
    
Jim, thank you for your valuable input, I implemented a k-way merge with priority queue, it performs very well. I had to mark another proposed solution as answer because it provided the code to go along with. But I keep on reading your articles and derive much value from it, given I am not working in this field, thus my apologizes for incorrect terminology used. –  Matt Wolf May 5 '12 at 8:39

You just have to merge your sequences like in a merge sort.

And this is parallelizable:

  1. merge sequences (1 and 2 in 1/2), (3 and 4 in 3/4), …
  2. merge sequences (1/2 and 3/4 in 1/2/3/4), (5/6 and 7/8 in 5/6/7/8), …

Here is the merge function :

int j = 0;
int k = 0;
for(int i = 0; i < size_merged_seq; i++)
{
  if (j < size_seq1 && seq1[j] < seq2[k])
  {
    merged_seq[i] = seq1[j];
    j++;
  }
  else
  {
    merged_seq[i] = seq2[k];
    k++;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
You need to add the leftovers when you hit the end of either input sequence. –  Servy May 4 '12 at 13:55
1  
Yes indeed, it forgot it. It is now corrected. –  Thomash May 4 '12 at 13:56
    
@Thomash, thanks for your input, I implemented something very similar albeit more generalized to handle n-sequences. –  Matt Wolf May 5 '12 at 8:37

Just merge the sequences. You do not have to sort them again.

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if he merged them as is he would get 1,2,3,5,7,13,2,3,6,4,5,6,7,8 surely? why not instead of sorting the 3 individually then trying to merge them, stick all 3 together in a haphazard order and just sort the final long one once? –  RhysW May 4 '12 at 13:49
1  
That depends on the merging algorithm. –  Sven Hager May 4 '12 at 13:51
1  
@RhysW: An n-way merge is not the same as appending. –  Jim Mischel May 4 '12 at 13:52
1  
@RhysW The numbers you gave would be the result of "concatting" the sequences, not merging them. –  Servy May 4 '12 at 13:52
1  
@RhysW What you describe is called appending. Google Mergesort for a definition of merging. –  Sjoerd May 4 '12 at 13:52

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