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I have this code:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Action whatToDo = () => {
            var member = (MemberInfo)(MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod());
            Thread.Sleep(0); //whatever, need something to put a breakpoint on
        };
        whatToDo();
    }
}

when I run it and use watch to look inside the object bound to member reference I see that MemberInfo.Name property has value <Main>b__0.

This looks weird. Why wouldn't reflection make use of whatToDo name? What if I had more that one action with the same signature inside one member function - how would I tell which one is reported?

Why is such a weird name returned by reflection?

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4  
It's an anonymous function, what else would you expect? This is an implementation detail, do not depend on it. –  asawyer May 4 '12 at 13:59
    
    
"Why wouldn't reflection make use of whatToDo name?" - with the amount of rep you've earned in c++, I know you know the difference between object variables and their values :) –  AakashM May 4 '12 at 14:05
    
@AakashM: Sure, but there's such thing as metadata in .NET. Why is the name not included into metadata? –  sharptooth May 4 '12 at 14:15
    
The name of what? What should it put in the metadata for this anonymous method: a = b = c = () => { Console.WriteLine(); }; ? –  AakashM May 4 '12 at 14:31
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1 Answer

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Lambda expressions which are being converted to delegates are transformed into methods. Your code is equivalent to:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Action whatToDo = MyLambda; // Method group conversion
        whatToDo();
    }

    static void MyLambda()
    {
        var member = (MemberInfo)(MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod());
        Thread.Sleep(0); //whatever, need something to put a breakpoint on
    }
}

... except that the compiler is smart enough to create new classes where necessary for captured variables etc. While in my transformation the extra method is called MyLambda, the C# compiler generates unspeakable names which aren't valid C# identifiers (to avoid collisions, prevent you from accessing them directly etc).

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I seem to recall seeing an answer by you to another question directly addressing the unspeakable "weird name" that the OP refers to. –  BoltClock May 4 '12 at 14:00
    
@BoltClock I know I've read answers from Eric Lippert explaining some of the details before, but I didn't favorite it regrettably. –  asawyer May 4 '12 at 14:01
1  
I found this. Although that name is of an anonymous class type, it isn't all that different from anonymous delegate types... –  BoltClock May 4 '12 at 14:04
4  
@BoltClock That links to the post I was thinking about, awesome: stackoverflow.com/questions/2508828/… –  asawyer May 4 '12 at 14:05
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