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Good morning,

In a query I was writing yesterday between two decent-sized result sets (<50k results each), part of my JOIN was a clause to check if the data matched or was null (simplified version below):

SELECT a JOIN b ON a.class = b.class OR (a.class is null AND b.class is null)

However, I noticed a serious performance issue centered around the use of the OR statement. I worked around the issue using the following:

SELECT a JOIN b ON NVL(a.class, 'N/A') = NVL(b.class, 'N/A')

The first query has an unacceptably long run time, while the second is a couple of orders of magnitude faster (>45 minutes vs. <1). I would expect the OR to run slower due to more comparisons, but the cases in which a.class = b.class = null are comparatively few in this particular dataset.

What would cause such a dramatic increase in performance time? Does Oracle SQL not short-circuit boolean comparisons like many other languages? Is there a way to salvage the first query over the second (for use in general SQL not just Oracle)?

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3  
Did you use EXPLAIN PLAN to uncover the different execution paths for each query? –  APC May 4 '12 at 15:49
2  
Note that for the rows with NULL values, you are producing a cross-product here. Is that really what you want? –  Dave Costa May 4 '12 at 16:00
    
There are additional conditions in the JOIN which I did not think were necessary to include in the example. The goal is to resolve the case of null=null in a timely manner, as well as why the first query is almost glacial compared to the second. –  jtennen May 4 '12 at 17:34
    
Did you run EXPLAIN PLAN on your queries? See my answer below. Your join syntax is forcing the optimizer to choose two different paths to the data because it doesn't know that a.class should be compared to b.class in any way, shape, or form whenever a.class is null and b.class is null. –  N West May 4 '12 at 17:45

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're returning a cross product with any record with a null class. Is this OK for your results?

I created two sample query in 11gR2:

WITH a as 
(select NULL as class, 5 as columna from dual
 UNION
 select NULL as class, 7 as columna from dual
 UNION
 select NULL as class, 9 as columna from dual
 UNION
 select 'X' as class, 3 as columna from dual
 UNION
 select 'Y' as class, 2 as columna from dual),
 b as 
 (select NULL as class, 2 as columnb from dual
 UNION
 select NULL as class, 15 as columnb from dual
 UNION
 select NULL as class, 5 as columnb from dual
 UNION
 select 'X' as class, 7 as columnb from dual
 UNION
 select 'Y' as class, 9 as columnb from dual)
    SELECT * from a JOIN b ON (a.class = b.class 
                              OR (a.class is null AND b.class is null))

When I run EXPLAIN PLAN on this query, it indicates the tables (inline views in my case) are joined via NESTED LOOPS. NESTED LOOPS joins operate by scanning the first row of one table, then scanning each row of the other table for matches, then scanning the second row of the first table, looks for matches on the second table, etc. Because you are not directly comparing either table in the OR portion of your JOIN, the optimizer must use NESTED LOOPS.

Behind the scenes it may look something like:

  • Get Table A, row 1. If class is null, include this row from Table A on the result set.
  • While still on Table A Row 1, Search table B for all rows where class is null.
  • Perform a cross product on Table A Row 1 and all rows found in Table B
  • Include these rows in the result set
  • Get Table A, row 2. If class is null, include this row from Table A on the result set.
  • .... etc

When I change the SELECT statement to SELECT * FROM a JOIN b ON NVL(a.class, 'N/A') = NVL(b.class, 'N/A'), EXPLAIN indicates that a HASH JOIN is used. A hash join essentially generates a hash of each join key of the smaller table, and then scans the large table, finding the hash in the smaller table for each row that matches. In this case, since it's a simple Equijoin, the optimizer can hash each row of the driving table without problems.

Behind the scenes it may look something like:

  • Go through table A, converting NULL class values to 'N/A'
  • Hash each row of table A as you go.
  • Hash Table A is now in temp space or memory.
  • Scan table B, converting NULL class values to 'N/A', then computing hash of value. Lookup hash in hash table, if it exists, include the joined row from Table A and B in the result set.
  • Continue scanning B.

If you run an EXPLAIN PLAN on your queries, you probably will find similar results.

Even though the end result is the same, since you aren't joining the tables in the first query with "OR", the optimizer can't use a better join methodology. NESTED LOOPS can be very slow if the driving table is large or if you are forcing a full table scan against a large secondary table.

You can use the ANSI COALESCE function to emulate the NVL oracle function in other database systems. The real issue here is that you're attempting to join on a NULL value, where you really should have a "NO CLASS" or some other method of identifying a "null" class in the sense of null = nothing instead of null = unknown.

Addendum to answer your question in the comments:

For the null query the SQL engine will do the following:

  1. Read Row 1 from Table A, class is null, convert to 'N/A'.
  2. Table B has 3 Rows which have class is null, convert each null to 'N/A'.
  3. Since the first row matches to all 3 rows, 3 rows are added to our result set, one for A1B1, A1B2, A1B3.
  4. Read Row 2 From Table A, class is null, convert to 'N/A'/
  5. Table B has 3 Rows which have class is null, convert each null to 'N/A'.
  6. Since the second row matches to all 3 rows, 3 rows are added to our result set, one for A2B1, A2B2, A2B3.
  7. Read Row 3 From Table A, class is null, convert to 'N/A'/
  8. Table B has 3 Rows which have class is null, convert each null to 'N/A'.
  9. Since the third row matches to all 3 rows, 3 rows are added to our result set, one for A3B1, A3B2, A3B3. 10.. Rows 4 and 5 aren't null so they won't be processed in this portion of the join.

For the 'N/A' query, the SQL engine will do the following:

  1. Read Row 1 from Table A, class is null, convert to 'N/A', hash this value.
  2. Read Row 2 from Table A, class is null, convert to 'N/A', hash this value.
  3. Read Row 3 from Table A, class is null, convert to 'N/A', hash this value.
  4. Read Row 4 from Table A, class not null, hash this value.
  5. Read Row 5 from Table A, class not null, hash this value.
  6. Hash table C is now in memory.
  7. Read Row 1 from Table B, class is null, convert to 'N/A', hash the value.
  8. Compare hashed value to hash table in memory, for each match add a row to the result set. 3 rows are found, A1, A2, and A3. Results are added A1B1, A2B1, A3B1.
  9. Read Row 2 from Table B, class is null, convert to 'N/A', hash the value.
  10. Compare hashed value to hash table in memory, for each match add a row to the result set. 3 rows are found, A1, A2, and A3. Results are added A1B2, A2B2, A3B2.
  11. Read Row 3 from Table B, class is null, convert to 'N/A', hash the value.
  12. Compare hashed value to hash table in memory, for each match add a row to the result set. 3 rows are found, A1, A2, and A3. Results are added A1B3, A2B3, A3B3.
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I have not much experience with using EXPLAIN PLAN, but yes I see that the first query uses nested loops, and that is indeed where the majority of the CPU cost comes from. Thank you for a clear explanation. –  jtennen May 4 '12 at 18:09
    
EDIT: There are other conditions used in the JOIN than what I mentioned in the example, but how do you see a cross product formed? In the second case, if class is null it is converted to 'N/A', a value that doesn't exist in either table, then compared to 'N/A'. Is there something else I am overlooking? –  jtennen May 4 '12 at 18:21
    
See my addendum to my answer. Imagine if I replaced the NULL values with "A.class = 'Class1' and B.class = 'Class1', and there were multiple 'Class1' values on table A or table B. –  N West May 4 '12 at 19:01

In first case, because each null is different, database doesn't use optimization (for every row from a check each row from table b).

In second case database firstly change all nulls to 'N/A' and then only compare a.class and b.class, using optimization

Comparing nulls in Oracle is very time-consuming. Null is undefined value - one null is different from other null. Compare result of two almost identical queries:

select 1 from dual where null is null

select 1 from dual where null = null

Only first query with special is null clause return correct answer. Therefore, the null values can not be indexed.

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Try this one:

SELECT a from Table1 a JOIN JTable1 b ON a.class = b.class
where a.class is null
union all
SELECT a from Table1 a JOIN JTable1 b ON a.class = b.class
where b.class is null

should be magnatudes faster

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This doesn't return any data at all. NULL != NULL so the join will never happen in either case. –  N West May 4 '12 at 17:29
1  
I think you meant: SELECT a.class, columna, columnb from a JOIN b ON a.class = b.class UNION ALL SELECT a.class, columna, columnb from a CROSS JOIN b where a.class is null and b.class is null. This will still typically perform slower than converting the nulls to a value since you have to do a HASH JOIN and a MERGE JOIN CARTESIAN, followed up by the UNION ALL. –  N West May 4 '12 at 17:37

The explanation is simple: First one has to use nested loops in join operation, it always happened when you use OR operation. Second one has to use hash join operation, which faster then previous one.

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Why don't you make it little bit easier. like

SELECT * FROM a,b WHERE a.class(+)=b.class(+)

I think it's more readable.

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Even if that syntax worked (which I don't think it does) it would return a different result set. –  APC May 4 '12 at 15:46
    
Yeah, that's not the same thing –  Dave Costa May 4 '12 at 15:57
    
Please stop using the antiquated Oracle Join Syntax. –  N West May 2 '13 at 15:56

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